Tag Archives: Middle District of Georgia

Stefan F. Cook Major, US Army / Statement Press Release

Dr. Orly Taitz has filed on my behalf a Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) in Columbus Georgia to prevent me from deploying to Afghanistan until such time as Barack Obama produces definitive proof that he is a natural born US citizen.  The basis for the TRO is this:  It is my duty as an officer in the US Army to seek clarification as to the legality of orders directed to me by someone in my chain of command (The President of the United States/Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces of the United States) who is not eligible to do so.  Should Barack Obama be found not to be a natural born citizen of the US and I follow such an illegal order, I could be subject to punishment under the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ)  as well as should I have the misfortune of being captured by the enemy in Afghanistan, I could be subject to prosecution for war crimes as I was conducting military operations illegally.  I will not subject myself to such a possibility.  As an extension of this, each and every Soldier, Sailor, Airman and Marine who is deployed overseas could possibly find themselves in the same situation as I detailed above.  This is an unacceptable position. However, should Barack Obama definitively prove that he is in fact a natural born citizen of the US, and as such, eligible to be President of the US/Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces of the US, I shall deploy to Afghanistan as so ordered. This deployment to Afghanistan was a voluntary request on my part.  I am a patriotic citizen of the USA and Officer in the US Army and want to discharge those duties assigned to me in an honorable and legal fashion. I have thought long and hard on my decision to file this TRO.  I realize that this action may well end my career as an Army Officer.  I have discussed this decision with my family and they are understanding and supportive.  This has been a gut-wrenching decision to make.  For my entire career in the Army, it has been pounded into us that it is our duty to seek clarification on orders we deem to be questionable in their legality.  You sit through the academic exercise and have a discussion about it and move on to the next subject.  But when the situation actually arises (like my current situation), well that’s something else entirely.  You experience that “holy crap” moment and have to make a decision that may well affect your life from that point on.  I find myself in that position right now.  I have to have the moral courage to prosecute a course of action that is most distasteful, but yet needs to be done.

Onward into the breach, and faciendum est.

Stefan F. Cook
Major, US Army

The Major’s official Statement can also be found at: