Let’s Reflect on Pearl Harbor, and 166 years of Communist Advances


73 years ago this morning, 18 and a half years before I was born (wow, that makes me sound old), Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, was attacked.  My late father, and 18 and a half years old, a seaman barely out of training, was there.  He had joined the Navy to sea the world, and he had only enlisted 6 months before, on his 18th birthday, June 6, 1941, to learn something different about life from his father’s life farming cotton and corn in the piney woods and red soil of East Texas.  World War II gave him opportunities for rapid promotions and honors, of which he earned many.  I never got to talk to my Dad much about his experiences, and all I can remember him saying is about the smell of burning human flesh.

My Dad specifically said that he had never dreamt before what burning bodies might smell like, but that day, half way along the journey of life between his birth and mine, he learned and relearned the smell about 500 times and wondered whether he was next.  And then over the next four years he learned what human bodies looked like and smelled like in all sorts of states of decay and decomposition.  As in the time a kamikaze flier landed on the battleship deck but didn’t explode, and they couldn’t remove the body because they might trigger an explosion on deck (Sometimes in this modern world, cocooned in our coffee shops and Chinese restaurants, we think we have a hard life, but we really don’t, do we?  My father’s future wife [my mother] had already survived the London blitz by the time of Pearl Harbor, but she never had to learn those smells.  My grandfather from Galveston, Texas, was a special adviser to the Royal Navy sent under LBJ’s lend-lease program, but that was totally an office and port job, no significant time at sea at all.)

So Pearl Harbor and all that followed it was obviously a horrific experience the worst and most deadly war in human history, “but what good came of it at last?” And by “it” I mean all aspects of World War II?  Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, but historians are now pretty much unanimous in believing that Franklin D. Roosevelt did everything he could to prompt them to do so, because he, like Churchill, wanted to enter World War II for reasons that transcended any real notion of national security.

Patrick J. Buchanan is not alone among “historical revisionists” who now see World War II as an unnecessary war, which ultimately led to the Communist Domination of China and Indochina (Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos) in the East and all of “Eastern Europe” in the West.

Mark Weber of the IHR in Santa Ana regularly presents lectures on the dangers of “the Good War” mythology promoted around World War II, and many members of and sympathizers with the IHR bemoan the fact that World War II essentially destroyed what was left of European Civilization after World War I.

My own evolving perspective is that World War II was the culmination of a process of Marxist dialectical class change by modern, technologically brutal and destructive warfare which began in 1861 in the United States, although it was inspired by the Communist Manifesto of February 1848 in Europe.    So the “American Civil War” of 1861-1865, the “Great War” of 1914-1918, and World War II were all part of a single process of world transformation, it seems to be, guided by the spirit of international communism.

Thus I conclude, in briefest essence, Sunday, 7 December 1941 at Pearl Harbor was a political fraud, a pseudo-Platonic “noble lie” as some might say, much like Monday 11 September 2001 in New York City and Washington.  But was it really noble for our government to lie about why Americans should be killed and sacrificed on our home shores in order to justify more killing and sacrifice abroad?

What can we do with the Sesquicentennial of direct structural and functional progression between the U.S. Presidencies of Abraham Lincoln through Barack Obama?  Obama was elected in the 160th year of the Communist Manifesto, and I and many others consider Obama to be a very poorly disguised communist.  Even Newsweek Magazine trumpeted shortly after Obama was inaugurated (in February 2009), “We are all Socialists Now.”  Except I’m not, and a few friends of mine are not.

And by then by weird coincidence, Obama (in his first and second terms) got to preside entirely over the sesquicentennial of the American Civil War, which my ancestors called either the War Between the States or the War of Northern Aggression.  Naturally, the celebrations are very different then how they might have been had, for example, Strom Thurmond been elected in 1948, or George Wallace in 1968 (Strom never had a real chance at national election, but George definitely did in 1972, until (yes I guess I am a real “conspiracy theorist”) Nixon had him shot.

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