Tag Archives: Charles I Stuart

BANNING THE CONFEDERATE FLAG & MONUMENTS IS GENOCIDE BY DESTRUCTION OF SYMBOLS: IRELAND 1652, SCOTLAND 1748, IRELAND 1798, GERMANY 1918, GERMANY 1945, SOUTHERN USA 2015

The United States is currently engaged in a disgusting orgy of destruction which is going to be very difficult to recover from.  It is destruction of symbols with genocidal intent which, if successful, will destroy everything good about America.  No joke: everything.  The Confederate States of America was the last gasp of the original “Spirit of ’76” and once we destroy the symbols of the old South—it’s not long until we will be destroying all the symbols of the American Revolution—-because the two events were conceptually and strategically almost identical, and George Washington and Robert E. Lee’s father were not only neighbors along the Virginia side of the Potomac (Stafford, Mount Vernon, and Arlington) but cousins by marriage….

Destruction of Symbols sounds so very benign, when you say it unthinkingly, it sounds so sterile and academic, so far removed from physical harm.  Until you think of Leslie A. White’s definition of culture, which has pretty much become the primary accepted definition in anthropology: “Culture is Man’s extrasomatic adaptation to the Environment, DEPENDENT UPON SYMBOLLING.”

All of modern anthropology, linguistics, and social psychology focuses on the elementary nature and importance of symbols in the definition of social identity and social relations.

What the Obama administration and the wholly controlled “Mainstream Media” in the United States are doing is closely analogous to other monstrous events in Anglo-American history, the oldest of which are universally agreed to have been monstrous—although those more recent in time are still cherished by “the powers that be.”

1652—the Cromwellian “Act for the Settlement of Ireland” effectively abolished and destroyed, by outlawing its institutions and symbols (along with mass murder and slavery) all and everything that remained of traditional Ireland (medieval, primitive Christian with strong pagan syncretic elements).   Ostensibly, the reason was political conspiracy against his anti-monarchist “Commonwealth”. Cromwell attacked the (to modern American ears quite) ironically named “Confederate Royalists” of Ireland and systematically destroyed them as supporters of the late King Charles I Stuart and his sons Charles II and James II Stuart. What Cromwell did was to uproot an disperse all supporters of the “Confederate Royalists” who were the ethnic and cultural heirs the Celtic Ireland of the Four Kingdoms and the High Kingship of Tara.

This old Celtic Ireland was a land of poetic schools and wandering minstrels, in essence, the last relics and still active, vital, splendid cultural remnant of early Indo-European (etymologically Sanskrit “Aryan” = each of “Irish” and “Iranian” and [German] “Ehre” = “Noble”) Culture.  Both of my dear departed Irish-thinking friends in comparative linguistics, namely my graduate professor in that subject at Harvard, Dr. Calvert Watkins (1933-2013), and my dear friend and mentor (and fellow Harvard graduate in Anthropology from the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology), Dr. David Humiston Kelley (1924-2011), one of the greatest under-appreciated and under-published Anthropologists of the Twentieth Century, considered pre-Cromwellian Ireland a golden age of cultural purity, whose loss and destruction at Cromwell’s hands was reason enough to hate him, even if he had not been one of Europe’s earliest modern Genocidal mass murders.

SCOTLAND AFTER THE ’45—THE 1746-8 DESTRUCTION OF THE CLANS AFTER BONNIE PRINCE CHARLIE’S NEARLY SUCCESSFUL INVASION AND RECONQUEST OF BRITAIN-–almost exactly 100 years later, in a continuation of exactly the same confrontation of the Catholic Leaning Stuart Dynasty and the more “Radical Protestant” elements of the English Church, Scotland’s Gaelic (indigenous, insular Celtic) culture was laid waste in an episode of extreme symbolic genocide in the mid-18th century.

My family tree is mostly English with an admixture of French, Prussian, and Southern German [Alsatian and Austrian] heritage, and no known (insular) Celtic antecedents or traceable ancestors.  But my father was an Anglo-Catholic and a member of the Society of King Charles the Martyr, while my mother was a hopeless romantic and lover of lost causes, especially lost languages and cultural variants in Europe.  And so as their child I have always been deeply moved by the poetry of the Scots Gaelic language, the legacy of the clans and tartans of Scotland, and in particular of the story of “the Old Pretender” (James III’s) and “the Young Pretender” (Charles III’s) efforts to retake the throne of Britain for the Stuart Family in 1715 and 1745.  Bonnie Prince Charlie (aka “the Young Pretender” entombed in Rome as “Charles III King of England”) was “almost a winner.”  The voluntarily abortive story of his reconquest of England (George II was already packing to leave London for Hanover what Charles III turned back, despite being greeted by cheering crowds of Englishmen and women as far south as Derby) is strange, but irrelevant to the point here.

Marshal George Wade is hardly a household name, either in England or America, but he was the commander of the English forces who suppressed the Jacobites and destroyed the clans of Scotland.  Wade’s name was, in the 1740s, very well known because there was an extremely popular prayerful “hymn” about him, as he marched northward to Scotland to do the Hanoverian dirty work of Genocide with Cromwellian brutality and efficiency—that hymn was later rewritten to become “God Save the King” (a non-0fficial national anthem of England and pre-1965 Canada and Australia, and “My Country ’tis of Thee” in the United States.) 

Marshall Wade’s policy of Scottish Genocide focused on the destruction of the Celtic Clan system, and the destruction of the Highland Scottish nobility, just as Cromwell had focused on the extermination of the “Confederate Irish” nobility of the Emerald Isle in 1649-53.

The wearing of the kilt and tartan were among the cruelest and most tortuous aspects of the Suppression of Scotland in 1747-48.  It was made a capital offense, punishable by hanging, to wear a kilt or tartan, and these prohibitions alone were sufficient to destroy the clan system, although the confiscation of all Jacobite lands certainly would have done substantial damage. 

WITHOUT THEIR SYMBOLS, A PEOPLE CANNOT EXIST.  Just as Christianity could not survive a prohibition on the Cross, the Lord’s prayer, and Sunday Church worship, the clans, at least as socio-politicaly cohesive and viable entities with power, could not survive the abolition of their symbols.

1798—They’re Hanging Men and Women for the Wearing of the Green. A mere 50 years later (after Marshal Wade had finished with Scotland, and ten years after the ban on the wearing of Kilts and Tartans had been lifted to a population, only the oldest and feeblest of whom could even remember having worn them before 1748), the Hanoverians (this time under “Mad King George” III) were at it again, this time suppressing a French-Revolutionary inspired “Bonapartist” uprising in Ireland.

And once again the British treatment of Ireland was brutal and genocidal.  It is a tribute to the strength of the Irish people that there are any of them left speaking Gaelic or remembering St. Patrick (whose veneration was also banned in 1798). In 1798, the British banned “the wearing of the Green”, even of Shamrocks, thus giving rise to the woeful Irish Ballad “They’re Hanging Men and Women for the Wearing of the Green.”  Irish identity survived, but it was a miracle that it did.  And all remnants of traditional Irish culture, except on the farthest and rockiest Western Atlantic Coastal shore islands, have been destroyed completely.

On April 10, the 208th Anniversary of the Birth of His Grace, CSA General Leonidas Polk, the First Episcopal Bishop of Louisiana

In thirty days, that is, on April 10, it will be the 208th Anniversary of the Birth of His Grace, General Leonidas Polk, the First Episcopal Bishop of Louisiana.  

OK, the Anglicans were clearly latecomers in Louisiana.  The RCs got here a long time before….although their Bishopric only preceded ours by a scant 48 years.  The RC ARCHDIOCESE OF NEW ORLEANS (NOVÆ AURELIÆ) was only erected on 25 April, 1793, as the Diocese of Saint Louis of New Orleans; raised to its present rank and title of Archdiocese on 19 July, 1850.  Amazingly enough to contemplate, the RC Bishop of New Orleans’ original territory comprised the entire original Louisiana purchase plus both East and West Florida, being bounded on the north by Canadian, on the west by the Rocky Mountains and the Rio Perdito, on the east by the English-speaking RC Diocese of Baltimore, and on the south by the Diocese of Linares and the Archdiocese of Durango.  The present boundaries of the RC Archdiocese include the State of Louisiana, between the twenty-ninth and thirty-first degree of north latitude, an area of 23,208 square miles (constantly shrinking due to bad hydraulic and wetland management, but that is a different story).

So it is no surprise that the political and ecclesiastical history of Louisiana are inextricably intertwined.  But Bishop Polk was, as they say, something completely different from any other prelate of local or even national memory.  He was a fighter.  I think it is important to remember and celebrate his 208th birthday this year because we have the opportunity to combine this celebration with the sesquicentennial memorial of his death and martyrdom on June 14, 2014, the hundred and fiftieth anniversary of his death from enemy cannon fire atop Pine Mountain in Cobb County, Georgia.  Cobb County’s county seat is Marietta, and it is the last county guarding the northern suburbs of Atlanta (Marietta is now, pretty much a northern suburb of Atlanta, but in the historical metaphor for Scarlett O’Hara’s mythic reality, it was separate.

And it was there, in the 32nd year of Cobb County’s creation out of the Cherokee nation, that General Leonidas Polk died defending the “Old South” (was it really old when it had only existed for 31 solid years—by it’s 32nd Birthday on 2 December 1864—Cobb County was occupied by Sherman’s troops and thus under the heals of the most brutal enemy any Americans had ever known.  Yes indeed, to Southern Partisans and Confederate Patriots, General Leonidas Polk died a hero to right and Constitutional Government, every bit as much as, perhaps more even, than King Charles the Martyr in January 1648/9.  Oliver Cromwell was probably a lot like Sherman, in his self-righteousness, but he lacked the technology and strength of force to be as savage and brutal.  And oddly enough, I doubt Cromwell would have used his power as brutally against his own people (Roundheads or Cavaliers) even if he had had it.  I could be wrong.

There is a Society of King Charles the Martyr (SKCM) to which my devoutly Anglo-Catholic Father belonged.  I have considered joining it.  And there SHOULD be a Society dedicated to the memory of His Grace, General Leonidas Polk of Louisiana.  If I could find any “fellow travelers” I would certainly organize such a society, and you’d think I’d have an easy time of it.

When in New Orleans, on most Sundays (and on this immediate past Ash Wednesday) I attend services at Christ Church Cathedral on St. Charles & Sixth Street, the seat of the Episcopal Diocese of Louisiana.   His Grace, General Polk, has a magnificent tombstone inside the Cathedral, just to the right of the altar (when facing the Cross) and behind the elaborately carved, elevated wooden pulpit. On other Sundays, more rare in the past but perhaps soon to be more commonly, I attend Holy Eucharist at Trinity Church on Jackson Street, built under the direction of Bishop Polk in the 1850s, with an auditorium called “Bishop Polk Hall.”

And yet everyone in the Episcopal Diocese of Louisiana is totally embarrassed by General Leonidas Polk.  “He was a villain” said Christ Church Cathedral Dean David A. duPlantier on Sunday, 20 October of last year (2013), just before delivering a sermon on the Parable of the Unjust Judge (Luke 18: 1-8), which just happens to be one of my favorite texts in the Bible.  And yes, I thought the irony was delicious: that Dean DuPlantier so harshly and unjustly judged the founder of the Church where he preaches….  I have become much colder in my feelings towards Christ Church Cathedral ever since.  How can they dishonor their founder?  How can a people so viciously toss away and condemn their own heritage?  My grandmother was baptized in a Church (Holy Trinity) built by Bishop Polk in Nachitoches, Louisiana even before Trinity on Jackson here in New Orleans.  Holy Trinity in Nachitoches is, I think, the oldest standing Episcopal Church west of the Mississippi.  It may well be the oldest Protestant Church West of the Mississippi.  Trinity on Jackson is, to be sure, East of the Mississippi although only by a few blocks.

I grieve for the disregarded and disrespected heritage of my Southern Ancestors who fought for freedom.  I certainly do not grieve for the passing of slavery, but I think the price was much too high: in no other nation on earth did it require a bloody “civil war” to abolish slavery.   Nor was the War of 1861-65 really either a Civil War nor a War to End Slavery—it was the first experiment in self-righteous Yankee Imperialism by a powerful centralized government designed for world conquest for the benefit of the few, not the many, and above all for the occult purpose of instituting a form of government which can only by called, somewhat ironically, “Corporate Communism”—an oligarchy of institutions sponsored by the government and sponsoring the government, who protest and proclaim that their purpose is to redistribute wealth and grant equality to all people.  

To all people except those who remember and respect history, of course.

 

Historical Notes for January 17, 2013

Today, January 17, 2013 is a day with historical relevance to many schisms. In A.D. 395, the Emperor Theodosius died in Milan (then known as Mediolanum). His two sons Arcadius and Honorius split the Roman Empire (whose capital was no longer “Rome” but Milan and Constantinople). Then on this day in 1377, almost a thousand years after the division of the Eastern and Western Empires), Pope Gregory XI moved the seat of the papacy back from Avignon to Rome. In 1648, the Roundheads in the Long Parliament voted to terminate negotiations with Charles I, leading to the English Civil War, and one year later, on January of 1649, the execution of King Charles “the Martyr” Stuart. Finally, today is two days before Robert E. Lee’s 206th birthday (January 19, 1807). When Robert E. Lee was my age, 52, he had not yet arrested John Brown or gone to Texas to command Fort Mason, which was to be his last active post as an officer of the United States Army before his major role in history really began after the secession of his native Virginia.
Today is also a day of infamy in two regards: on this day in 1946 the United Nations Security Council held its first session, building towards the establishment of World Government with effective force and power. In a not entirely unrelated event, 45 years later in 1991, President George H.W. Bush, former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations and head of the C.I.A., falsely elected Vice-President with Ronald W. Reagan who had promised to get the U.S. out of the United Nations in 1980, launched what H.M. King George Bush I had expressly designed as a “New World Order” War with United Nations approval: the Gulf War Desert Storm in Iraq. I was totally opposed to that war and remain totally opposed to all its results and derivatives over the past 23 years of U.S. Empire Building in Western and Central Asia.