Tag Archives: Guatemala

DONALD TRUMP’S WALL AND WHAT IT MIGHT MEAN…. a debate inspired by Pat Buchanan’s “What Trump’s Wall Says to the World”

Asmodeous Rex • an hour ago
Donald J. Trump intention to build a wall at the southern border is an insult to all of Latin America.
• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Tim in NY to Asmodeous Rex • 13 minutes ago
Uh huh…
• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Charles Edward Lincoln, III to Asmodeous Rex • 43 minutes ago
I don’t see that the WALL is anything more than a re-inforced border. By your standard, Mr. Asmodeous, isn’t every border an equal insult?

Does your house have walls? is that not an insult to nature, or at least to your local weather and all your neighbors?

Walls don’t work against every kind of invasion or catastrophe (modern bombs and the IRS can penetrate almost everyone’s walls) but walls do serve to establish and declare one’s claim to private space, of reasonable expectation of peace and tranquility within a space that we can call “home”.

I don’t think Trump’s wall is going to change America—but it MIGHT help prevent MORE change than has already happened, and perhaps we can start deporting millions of people BACK on the other side of the wall who should never have crossed the border.

As a Symbol of National Sovereignty and Identity, I accept the need for a wall, although we will need to back up that SYMBOL with substantial action—I’d like to see every Latin American, African, and Asian Naturalized in 1986 by “Amnesty” to illegal alines or who immigrated after that date, lose his or her citizenship….

America is the New Jerusalem of the Europeans, by the Europeans, and for the Europeans….
3 • Edit• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Asmodeous Rex to Charles Edward Lincoln, III • 36 minutes ago
O.K. Your reply is sensible and polite enough but the USA should be building bridges to Latin America; not promoting distrust and hostility. Are you aware that the USA has spent a lot of money and energy and lives trying to prevent that region from turning to communism?
• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Charles Edward Lincoln, III to Asmodeous Rex • 26 minutes ago
That’s kind of preposterous: we have thousands of bridges of every type (air, land, and sea) to and from everywhere in Latin America. It’s easier and quicker to reach Puerto Vallarta, Mazatlan, Cancun or Acapulco from any major airline “hub” in the USA than it is to reach Alaska, which is one of our own states. It also easier and cheaper to take a cruise in the Caribbean than to Hawaii or American Samoa…or again, along the “inland passage” to Alaska… just compare the effort it will take you to get to Curacao compared to the Aleutian Islands…. I’ve done both trips….

As it happens, I turned 18 as a legal resident of Honduras while working on an archaeological research project at Copan sponsored by Harvard and the World Bank. And since then I have lived about a quarter of my life in Latin America since then, in Belize, Guatemala, and Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, and Venezuela….

And I have been living and or visiting in several Latin American countries during Coups…. or kidnappings (I once watched the helplessly as the German Consul in Guatemala was kidnapped)…. And on top of it all, my grandfather did major business with the U.S. Army, Navy, and Air Force, so yes, I’m quite aware of the U.S. attempts to fight communism all over Latin America….

So what exactly is your point? That because we have more-or-less succeeded in keeping communism from taking root anywhere except for Bolivia and Venezuela, and for a time in Chile—we should let all the rest of them in?

Chileans and Argentinians are pretty much “white people”…. as are MOST Colombians and many upper class Mexicans and Brazilians, for that matter, but other areas are much more racially mixed, and “upper class” immigration into the USA is NOT the source of any problems I’m aware of….
• Edit• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Asmodeous Rex to Charles Edward Lincoln, III • 17 minutes ago
So then what is your point? What you’re saying is that there is already a lot of trade and commerce with that region. Shouldn’t that continue? Why create new hostilities in a region that wants to further integrate. I do hope sane people will stop all this recent madness.
• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Charles Edward Lincoln, III to Asmodeous Rex • a minute ago
I guess we’re basically talking past each other about totally different things. You’re talking about Trade I guess, mostly, but I’m talking about the need to preserve America’s cultural and racial integrity by stopping the flood of immigrants. I don’t despise Latin American elites or peasantry IN THEIR CULTURAL CONTEXT. I think a lot of valuable lessons can be learned from the study of the Ancient AND Modern Maya—among other things, the value they have placed since the Spanish Conquest on resistance to cultural and racial assimilation.

The Maya of Yucatan and Guatemala are a great noble people. But that doesn’t mean they need to all move to Los Angeles. Out of heir historical physical environment and cultural historical context, I don’t think their nobility will survive any more than their culture. Los Angeles and Phoenix do not need to become Maya Cities—or Quechua cities or Nahuatl Cities for that matter.

Los Angeles has now the largest ZAPOTEC SPEAKING population IN THE WORLD…. larger than any city in the Zapotec Native (Mexican) State of Oaxaca. This is bizarre and perverse. The Zapotec will NEVER become real Americans but they won’t be real Zapotec anymore either. The Nahuatl (Aztec) speaking population of Los Angeles is not far behind. This is insanity. This is a perversion of nature.

And as for Trade, which seems to be your focus, I DO disagree with you if you think that NAFTA has been good for Mexico or that CAFTA is good for Central America.

Many if not MOST of our real racial problems, and especially those of Europe, come from the heritage of a Colonialism which was abandoned, not because the British and French and Dutch (or the Belgians or Germans, for that matter) FAILED at their enterprises of Colonialism, but because of the post-World-War II ideological shift….. towards communistic insanity and the demented doctrine of unearned freedom and meritless equality….

But NAFTA and CAFTA are essentially new Colonialist programs WITHOUT the benefits of Colonial Administration and Education. NAFTA and CAFTA have led to the mutual cultural degradation of North America AND Mexico and Central America…. and I applaud President Trump for his willingness to back away from these catastrophic enterprises (and to avoid new ones like the Trans-Pacific, which would have been the same only MUCH BIGGER and hence much worse).

Isolation leads to diversity…. and diversity leads to greater value in exchange…. So I think that we need to return to a world model where each region develops itself according to local traditions and environmental circumstances, and trade is an exchange of positive values developed in different regions, not moving plastics and electronics from cheap labor areas to expensive consumption areas.

So no, I think that fewer bridges and more barriers will benefit EVERYONE.
• Edit• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Funruffian • 20 hours ago
“To the tens of millions for whom Trump appeals, what the wall represents is our last chance to preserve that nation and people.’

This wall is more than just Political theater and a way to stymie the bureaucratic onslaught of the Multicultural monster. This is a bold statement White America is making against the world who has intentions of undermining and destroying us. Many other nations have criticized America for years, but at the same token they want to reap the rewards and benefits America has to offer. I know that President Trump finds this attitude obscene.
16 • Reply•Share ›

August 9—which was worse: Nagasaki, Dresden, or Auschwitz? In Memory of the Victims of Nagasaki, August 9, and the Sharon Tate Murders, 1969, with thoughts about the Warren Commission and its members, including Gerald Rudolph Ford

On a certain level, I think it is a nearly inexcusable miscarriage of justice that so many “High Command” and “Middle Level Command” Nazis were hanged for their war crimes in and relating to World War II, while no one has ever been punished for the bombings of Hiroshima, Nagasaki or Dresden in 1945.  

Today, on August 9, 2013, the 68th anniversary of the “Fat Boy” Plutonium Bomb being used against Madame Butterfly’s hometown…. I think it is incumbent on all of us to reflect that maybe the U.S. was not so great and morally superior to Nazi Germany, and maybe the War, and the Myth of “the Good War” are just that, all mythological.   The aftermath of Roosevelt’s corporate-communist reforms in America has been the complete subversion of the constitution and the advent of Globalism.   (As I have often argued, the concept of “corporate-communism” is consistent with, and I submit actually arose from, the concept of “Industrial Armies” as articulated in the Communist Manifesto of 1848—what is a vast corporation BUT an Industrial Army?  This, again, is why I say that, at least from the standpoint of economics, there is NO SUCH THING as Fascism, only different propagandistic “spins” on communism).

Harry S. Truman, who ordered the Bombs Dropped, and Eisenhower, who led the allied troops to conquer and subjugate Germany, set Roosevelt’s corporate-commonist system into stone over the next 15 years.  The only President who might have attacked the International Banks and preserved the Constitution was gunned down in a hale of bullets fired when I was three and a half years old in the nearest thing I have to a hometown (though I wasn’t born there) of Dallas, Texas.    His successor (LBJ) was a classic corrupt politician who would do and did anything for power and position, whose first act in office was to abolish silver currency (because that’s the logical first step when your predecessor is assassinated, right?).  LBJ’s second was to form a Commission to cover up and forever confuse the truth about the crime of assassination itself.  The membership of which commission included future President Gerald R. Ford and future Pennsylvania Senator Arlen Specter.  

Also prominent on the Warren Commission was Allen Welsh Dulles, the former head of the CIA and the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR).  Aside from having a brother (John Foster) who was Eisenhower’s Secretary of State and a senior partner at Sullivan & Cromwell, Allen Dulles is perhaps best known for his involvement in the planning the overthrow of Mohammed Mossadeq in 1953, a decisive factor in shaping the world map along Orwellian “1984” lines 31 years ahead of schedule.  Dulles also subverted democracy in Guatemala and for all  his services they named a large airport near Washington in Virginia was later named after him (and his brother).  No person on the Warren Commission had more distinguished credentials in subverting democracy and falsifying history than Dulles, except perhaps Chief Justice Earl Warren, who had presided first over the erection and operation of Japanese Nisei Concentration Camps in California during the years 1942-1945 and then over the equally brutal, cynical and manipulative Civil Rights Revolution in the 1950s-1960s.

Yea, verily, I say unto you—no I will merely ask you: was the United States ever morally superior to Nazi Germany during World War II or after?   Was Allen Dulles REALLY not a war criminal?  Was Harry Truman and were all those involved in dropping the two bombs (August 6 and 9, 1945) not really and truly war criminals?  I think the argument can be made that “war is hell” and that Truman and Dulles were NOT War Criminals—but if they were not, than the descendants of all those Nazis Hanged by the Nuremberg and other tribunals are entitled to sue (with full waiver of statutes of limitation) for wrongful death and malicious prosecution.  

Whether the Nazis wanted to or not, they never incinerated between 70-75,000 human beings in a single second, but that is what happened in Nagasaki on this day, August 9, 1945.  And another 75,000 were burned, injured, but who cares about them, right?

Is it time to stop claiming that we were morally superior?   I am not exactly defending the Nazis here.  I highly value Democratic Process, I highly value Freedom of Speech, and especially the absolutely rigid and unwavering tolerance  of dissenting ideas.  (As oxymoronic as it sounds, anything less than rigid and unwavering tolerance of dissenting ideas is simply intolerable—and here I  include SO many degradations of and derogations and deviations from true, First Amendment, Freedom of Speech in the rapidly evolving American-New World Order framed by G.W. Bush and B.H. Obama.  I value a lot of things that the Nazis obviously repressed very severely.  No, I could never be or ever have been a brownshirt (nor a Maoist Redshirt), but that’s in part because I just dislike power and would never want to help anyone acquire a lot of it if that person was involved in book-burning and mass arrests leading to mass murder of dissidents.  There are merely all the same reasons I could never support Obama.

BUT I do think that the Nazis may have been, on the whole, more open and honest about their goals while the Western Governments have specialized more in deceit and deception.  I do think that the West may have decided to back the Communists of Russia rather than the Nazis because the Nazis saw some of the corruption of the International Banking System which both the West and the Soviets actually valued.  

Goebbels was even more honest about trying to use lies as a propaganda tool.  These days, they just call propaganda, “the CBS Morning and Evening News” in the USA—and my former Law Professor Cass Sunstein is the Propaganda Czar for Obama… he was the lone (admitted, open, “out of the closet”) liberal at the University of Chicago Law School when I attended there.  I do not see Sunstein as in any sense superior to Goebbels.  Goebbels gave better speeches than Sunstein gave lectures in class… that’s for sure.

In 1969, a deranged sicko by the name of Charles Manson desecrated the Nazi Swastika, took even that much maligned “twisted cross” in vain and tattooed it on his forehead, and hoped to start a race war in the USA—or so they say.  I wonder whether it was just a planned show to freak the American people out, like so much that happens on TV, I mean, on TV news…  It is another major miscarriage of justice to think that such great minds as Hermann Goering and Arthur Seyss-Inquart were executed at Nuremberg but Charles Manson and all the members of his “family” were allowed to live after what they did to Roman Polanski’s Dallas-Texas born wife Sharon Tate on August 9, 1969, and that Manson has managed to maintain his celebrity status throughout his years in California prisons.

No, evenness of justice “equality under the law” is definitely no great triumph of the American way either (remembering that it was Justice Robert Jackson who led the prosecutions at Nuremberg).

And by some astounding coincidence, one of the aforementioned members of the Warren Commission, Gerald Rudolph Ford, became President on this day in 1974, an event which I recall watching from the gigantic old black-and-white TV we used to have out in Lago Vista, upon the resignation and departure from Washington of Richard M. Nixon.

If I had a Rocket Launcher, I’d aim it at the Federal Reserve (in Homage to Bruce Cockburn)

Bruce Cockburn is a Canadian folk-singer with a high mind and a social conscience.  He undoubtedly considers himself a liberal.   Cockburn might well be appalled to learn that a right-wing radical like myself was incorporating a couple of his songs into his own right-wing ideological repertoire—but then, perhaps this is one of those moments when radicals on both sides find common ground.  The primary difference between Cockburn and myself is that he probably sees the United States as one of the chief purveyors of violence and injustice to the rest of the world; and while this is indisputably and absolutely true, I read his songs as an American Citizen, resident of the future North American Nation of PANEM,  as one of the victims of precisely the same violence and injustice, only visited by my own government on me and “my fellow Americans.”

Bruce Cockburn recorded this first song, “Call it Democracy” on September 11, 2008, the seventh anniversary of that day of infamy known as 9/11/01: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68zccrskOqQ

By an odd coincidence of sorts, this was my first 9/11 back in the USA (Cambridge, Mass., actually) after being forcibly repatriated to the U.S. on the orders of U.S. Southern District of Texas Judge Janis Graham Jack, having spent the previous 9/11 in Cockburn’s home country of Canada with no plans of ever returning to the USA.   I totally agree with what Cockburn says about the IMF and its debilitating effect on the Third World.  But for the IMF and NAFTA, Mexico might well have remained the beautiful, peaceful and quiet place it was right up through Pope John Paul II’s first visit there in January 1979—the month during which Mexico’s creole government’s excellent and highly responsible national birth control program was first attacked to the point of almost instantaneous dismantlement.  

But substitute the words “Federal Reserve” for “IMF” and “Call it Democracy” becomes a description of the degradation of the United States of America by “insupportable debt” under the quintumvirate of Reagan, Bush, Clinton, Bush, and Obama over the past 33 years:

Padded with power here they come
International loan sharks backed by the guns
Of market hungry military profiteers
Whose word is a swamp and whose brow is smeared
With the blood of the poor

Who rob life of its quality
Who render rage a necessity
By turning countries into labour camps
Modern slavers in drag as champions of freedom

Sinister cynical instrument
Who makes the gun into a sacrament —
The only response to the deification
Of tyranny by so-called “developed” nations’
Idolatry of ideology

North South East West
Kill the best and buy the rest
It’s just spend a buck to make a buck
You don’t really give a flying fuck
About the people in misery

IMF dirty MF
Takes away everything it can get
Always making certain that there’s one thing left
Keep them on the hook with insupportable debt

See the paid-off local bottom feeders
Passing themselves off as leaders
Kiss the ladies shake hands with the fellows
Open for business like a cheap bordello

And they call it democracy
And they call it democracy
And they call it democracy
And they call it democracy

See the loaded eyes of the children too
Trying to make the best of it the way kids do
One day you’re going to rise from your habitual feast
To find yourself staring down the throat of the beast
They call the revolution

IMF dirty MF
Takes away everything it can get
Always making certain that there’s one thing left
Keep them on the hook with insupportable debt.

The next song: If I had a rocket launcher, (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9HFjErMMlA).  Cockburn encapsulates and articulates how I feel about U.S. Foreign Policy in Afghanistan, Iraq, and indeed, all the Central American Countries that were the focus of Cockburn’s lyric folk poetry in the 1980s.  To modernize this 1984 song for the Obamanation we live in today, just substitute the words “stealth drone” for “helicopter”. Afghanistan for Guatemala, and (soon coming to a river near you) “Mississippi” for the “Rio Lacantún”.  As it happens I’ve never been to Afghanistan but I certainly have been all along the Rio Lacantún and I know its people very well.  

When I was indicted in December 1999 I was instructed that I could not own any guns.  My son at 7 was much too young to take my collection and his mother Elena was uninterested.  My grandmother (who died with a gun beside her bed) was too old to worry about such things, although she cared.  Many people in Mexico had previously asked me to bring down American firearms because gun sales were controlled and regulated in Mexico for a long time.  So in January 2000 I arranged to deliver donate my entire firearm collection to the Maya Resistance in Chiapas. The Yucatec Maya with whom I worked at Chichén Itzá and elsewhere were great admirers of their cousins in Chiapas (many of whom were in fact Lacandon Maya who speak a “hill country” dialect of the Yucatec language).   I’m sure my 300 some odd weapons went to good use, so I have no regrets whatsoever about making this gift and passing on a legacy of patriotic resistance from Texas to the Maya Lowlands (which were once joined in an alliance during the 1840s when both areas were secessionist Republics breaking away from Mexico).  In fact, making this donation was one of the ways in which I made sure that I followed my grandfather’s advice in “always turning a bad thing into a good thing.”  

So I ask you: IF YOU HAD A ROCKET LAUNCHER: against whom would you aim it?  And I ask you again: IS IT NOT PART OF OUR SECOND AMENDMENT RIGHTS THAT WE ALL SHOULD HAVE ROCKET LAUNCHERS, as part of a “Well-Regulated Militia” of Freedom Loving Americans?

Here comes the helicopter — second time today
Everybody scatters and hopes it goes away
How many kids they’ve murdered only God can say
If I had a rocket launcher…I’d make somebody pay

I don’t believe in guarded borders and I don’t believe in hate
I don’t believe in generals or their stinking torture states
And when I talk with the survivors of things too sickening to relate
If I had a rocket launcher…I would retaliate

On the Rio Lacantun, one hundred thousand wait
To fall down from starvation — or some less humane fate
Cry for Guatemala, with a corpse in every gate
If I had a rocket launcher…I would not hesitate

I want to raise every voice — at least I’ve got to try
Every time I think about it water rises to my eyes.
Situation desperate, echoes of the victims cry
If I had a rocket launcher…Some son of a bitch would die.

CREDO LIBERTATE:  THE RIGHT TO KEEP AND BEAR ROCKET LAUNCHERS IS AS FUNDAMENTAL AS THE RIGHT TO KEEP AND BEAR ALL OTHER KINDS OF ARMS NECESSARY TO DEFEND INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP FREEDOM.