Tag Archives: Jubal Early

Was Judas’ Betrayal of Jesus any worse than the U.S. Episcopal Church’s Betrayal of its own English Heritage?

Today, April 2, marks the 150th anniversary of the end of the Confederate States of America as a viable political entity.  There were no memorials or eulogies.  The world, even the South, lives largely in a state of amnesia induced by foreign occupation and subjugated defeat.  We have betrayed our ancestors ideals of constitutional government and genuine freedom by tolerating the most corrupt and perverse government, and a culture filled with lies, that is humanly imaginable.

While serving as President of the CSA, Jefferson Davis once commented on the comparisons to be made between the war of 1861-65 between the Northern and Southern United States and the English Civil War between “Roundhead” Protestant Radicals, led by Oliver Cromwell, and the Church of England and its Constitutional Monarchy, led by the two Kings Charles Edward Stuart, I and II.

Davis commented that the South had inherited the noble Cavalier mantle of King Charles the Martyr and that it was at war with a nation of self-righteous meddlesome bigots.  Davis never understood the close relationship between Abraham Lincoln and Karl Marx, or the historically decisive nature of that alliance.   

But the fact remains that there is a close relationship between the Episcopal Church/Church of England, and the South and its heritage.  Almost all the leaders of the Confederate South, including Jefferson Davis, Alexander Hamilton Stephens, Braxton Bragg, Jubal Early, Robert E. Lee, Albert Sidney Johnston, Joseph E. Johnston, and John Bell Hood, and Patrick Cleburne were Episcopalians.  Major exceptions were Judah P. Benjamin (Jewish) and P.T.G. Beauregard (Roman Catholic).

On this day a hundred and fifty years ago, April 2, 1865, General Robert E. Lee and President Jefferson Davis evacuated the Confederate Capital at Richmond. It had been a terrible mistake to move the Capital from inaccessible Montgomery, Alabama, to Richmond, too close to Washington.

But today, on this sad sesquicentennial, I attended Maundy Thursday services at Christ Church Cathedral in the 2900 block of St. Charles Avenue in New Orleans, where Confederate General Leonidas Polk was First Bishop of Louisiana, and where that Southern hero’s remains are buried.

Yesterday, Canon Steve Roberts in his Holy Week Wednesday Homily had spoken of betrayal—Judas’ “betrayal of Jesus, of course, being one of the key events of Holy Week. Canon Roberts had spoken of the experience of betrayal in everyday life—“there has to be a relationship of trust, for betrayal to happen…..we cannot be betrayed by strangers who hardly know us.”

I charge again that the Diocese of Louisiana has betrayed the Memory of General Polk by condemning the freedom Polk (and a million other southerners) fought for, and for which so many hundreds of thousands gave their lives.

Polk is a gigantic figure in the history of this place. Even today his name has a visible relationship to this Diocese and to many a parish in this state. His picture is on the walls of Christ Church. His tombstone is the largest single monument to any North American personage at the right hand of the Great Christ Church Altar.

Trinity Episcopal on Jackson Avenue still has “Bishop Polk Hall” as its central and largest meeting place. I do not think it should ever rename that Hall…. because the name of Leonidas Polk is hallowed from Natchitoches Trinity Church where my grandmother Helen was baptized on South.

I ask today, as I have asked before—how can we be true to ourselves if we distain, if we dishonor our heritage?

Could Rome ever disown Saints Peter and Paul? Could Jerusalem ever forget James, the Brother of Jesus, and that City’s own first Bishop? Should England, Greece, Russia, and Scotland ever forget Saints Andrew and Saint George?

No more should Louisiana forget Bishop Leonidas Polk and the Constitutional Government of the Confederate States of America for which His Grace, General Leonidas Polk, fought and died.

Deploring the Fourth of July—the Lost Spirit of ’76—Mourning the Death of Liberty on July 4, 1863 and 150 Years Later

http://tenthamendmentcenter.com/2013/07/03/uncelebrate-the-fourth/#.UdSY9RYTElI

It is no accident, coincidence or mistake that the Battles of Gettysburg and Vicksburg weigh so heavily on the American mind and consciousness.  On this day in 1863, if the Confederate States of America ever had any chance of winning its independence or achieving a newly restored constitutional synthesis in the USA, that chance died along with thousands of men, in both blue and grey, on the fields and rolling hills and ridges of Southern Pennsylvania and the bluffs of the Mississippi River and the Yazoo Basin.   I love the memory of the South and honor the legacy of my Confederate Ancestors, but the memory of the freedom that existed before 1861 is bittersweet indeed.   The modern world is a world of cruel, industrial slaughter and subjugation.   The spirt of the times was different, very different, as David Brooks recorded in yesterday’s New York Timeshttp://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/02/opinion/brooks-why-they-fought.html?_r=0.  The key point of Brooks’ article may be the final paragraph (it was a Christian nation and the warriors believed in God, and their covenant with the Almighty):

“These letter writers, and many of the men at Gettysburg, were not just different than most of us today because their language was more high flown and earnest. There was probably also a greater covenantal consciousness, a belief that they were born in a state of indebtedness to an ongoing project, and they would inevitably be called upon to pay these debts, to come square with the country, even at the cost of their lives.

Makes today’s special interest politics look kind of pathetic.”

Today, in the midst of our world of special interest politics (most fairly called the politics of distraction and inattention to real detail), e now have antibiotics, air-conditioning, and refrigeration, we can even choose our own favorite brand of tooth paste, and as a direct consequence of these technological matters we live longer.  But (to paraphrase Patrick Henry) is life so dear or peace so sweet that we would live it as slaves in chains?  Was freeing four million slaves from formal and open slavery paid for the occult and hermeneutic (but much more severe) total slavery of a nation of 300 million?  We awaken each day to television and internet broadcasts which divert our attention from real problems.   We live and sleep in a soft cocoon of dissimulated reality.

The Tenth Amendment Center’s article above refers to modern America’s 4th of July celebration as a lie, a major deception.  This ten year old article is surely correct, but Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg address, delivered later that year after the smoke of the battle had long blown off, was a much greater day of deception.  Old “Uncle Abe’s” carefully collected and assembled words amounted to the height of hypocrisy and disingenuous political manipulation.  Overlooking the graves of the thousands of fallen soldiers and the Constitution for which they fought, if you can manage in your mind merely but absolutely, to invert every line of the speech my distant kinsman gave in November 1863—you will see the reality, “A new nation conceived in tyranny and dedicated to the proposition that all men should equally be chattel slaves in bondage to their government”.   I read his cynical text with horror, trying to imagine what the reaction to his true purposes would have been, had he had the nerve to announce the true provisions of the new Constitution which he was creating by and through that horrible war.   

I am not at all sure that the authors of the Tenth Amendment society were specifically thinking about the 150th anniversary of Vicksburg and Gettysburg 10 years ago.  But I know I am thinking about mourning those calamities today.  The Spirit of 76 is all but dead.  The heirs of the Revolution have lost control of the country, and the reality is that the United States “conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal” was the country being buried at Gettysburg, and now almost forgotten.

I have often visited the Battlefield at Vicksburg but never been to Gettysburg.  I think I would find the latter much too emotional, in part because of my hatred of the falsity of the Gettysburg Address and what it implied.  Six of my ancestors fought there.  One was taken a prisoner.  None of my ancestors fought at Vicksburg or in the Western or Trans-Mississippi theatres of war at all.

General Lee lost at Gettysburg, but much more significantly, General Grant won at Vicksburg.  Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia only had one reasonable strategy and that was to Capture Washington, D.C., and make IT the new Capital of the Confederacy.  He and Jubal Early came so close on so many occasions, but they failed.  Lee’s victory would have been largely symbolic—the North could have continued the War without Washington, D.C., although the boost to Confederate prestige by occupying the capital city would have been enormous, both at home and abroad, internationally.  

And it was the lack of solid international recognition (specifically England’s and France’s refusal, in the aftermath of the Marxist led and inspired uprisings of 1848, to which both Queen Victoria’s and Emperor Napoleon III’s governments correctly connected Lincoln’s and the Republican Party’s rise) which doomed the Confederacy more than any other single factor in the war, aside from the north’s sheer brute strength, and genuine brutality.  

Yankee brutality was apparent nowhere more than in the six week siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi, by Ulysses S. Grant, which reduced the population, military and civilian, to eating rats before the riverside fortress-town’s defenders’ final surrender on July 4, 1863.  The skirmishes between Seminary ridge and Cemetery Ridge at Gettysburg suggested a kinder and gentler war, more humane and genteel, by comparison.  But on those two battlefields died the heart and soul of the American dream of liberty and freedom, never really to rise up again over the past 150 years.

Uncelebrating the Fourth

by  on July 3, 2013 in Featured 2

by Harry Browne, Originally written July 2003

Unfortunately, July 4th has become a day of deceit.

On July 4, 1776, the Continental Congress formally declared its independence from Great Britain. Thirteen years later, after a difficult war to secure that independence, the new country was open for business.

It was truly unique – the first nation in all of history in which the individual was considered more important than the government, and the government was tied down by a written Constitution.

It was the one nation where you could live your life secure in the knowledge that no one would ask for your papers, where you weren’t identified by a number, and where the government wouldn’t extort a percentage of your income as the price of holding a job.

And so each year July 4th has been a commemoration of the freest country in history.

False Celebration

But the America that’s celebrated no longer exists.

The holiday oratory deceitfully describes America as though it were the unique land of liberty that once was. Politicians thank the Almighty for conferring the blessings of liberty on a country that no longer enjoys those blessings. The original freedom and security have disappeared, even though the oratory lingers on.

What made America unique is now gone, and we are much the same as Germany, France, England, or Spain, with:

  • confiscatory taxes,
  • a Constitution and Bill of Rights that are symbolic only – merely documents used to justify governmental actions that are in fact prohibited by those documents,
  • business regulated by the state in the most minute detail,
  • no limits on what Congress or the President might decide to do.

Yes, there are some freedoms left, but nothing like the America that was and nothing that you can’t find in a few dozen other countries.

The Empire

Gone, too, is the sense of peace and security that once reigned throughout the land. America, bound by two huge oceans and two friendly neighbors – was subject to none of the never-ending wars and destruction that plagued Europe and Asia.

Now, however, everyone’s business is America’s business. Our Presidents consider themselves the rulers of the world – deciding who may govern any country on earth and sending Americans to die enforcing those decisions.

Whereas America was once an inspiration to the entire world – its very existence was proof that peace and liberty really were possible – Americans now live in fear of the rest of the world and the rest of the world lives in fear of America.

The Future

Because the education of our children was turned over to government in the 19th century, generations of Americans have been taught that freedom means taxes, regulations, civic duty, and responsibility for the whole world. They have no conception of the better life that could exist in a society in which government doesn’t manage health care, education, welfare, and business – and in which individuals are free to plot their own destinies.

Human beings are born with the desire to make their own decisions and control their own lives. But in most countries government and social pressures work to teach people to expect very little autonomy.

Fortunately, in America a remnant has kept alive the ideas of liberty, peace, and self-respect – passing the concepts on from generation to generation. And so today millions of Americans know that the present system isn’t the right system – that human beings aren’t born to serve the state and police the world.

Millions more would be receptive upon being shown that it’s possible to have better lives than what they’re living now.

Both groups need encouragement to quit supporting those who are taking freedom away from them.

Become a member and support the TAC!

You and I may not have the money and influence to change America by ourselves, but we can keep spreading the word – describing a better society in which individuals are truly free and government is in chains (instead of the opposite).

And someday we may reach the people who do have the money and influence to persuade tens of millions of Americans to change our country for the better.

I don’t know that it’s going to happen, but I do know it’s possible. I know that the urge to live one’s own life is as basic in human beings as the will to live and the desire to procreate. If we keep plugging away, we may eventually tap into that urge and rally the forces necessary to restore the real America.

And then the 4th of July will be worth celebrating again.

Harry Browne (RIP 1933-2006), the author of Why Government Doesn’t Work and many other books, was the Libertarian Party presidential candidate in 1996 and 2000, a co-founder of DownsizeDC, and the Director of Public Policy for the American Liberty Foundation.  See his website.

Today in History—Life is Strife & Torment, Love & Sacrifice—July 11, 2009

Today in History — Saturday, July 11

The Associated Press (together with pointless commentary by Guy Fawkes himself—“Spare a penny for the Guy?”)

Today is Saturday, July 11, the 192nd day of 2009. There are 173 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On July 11, 1859, Big Ben, the great bell inside the famous London clock tower, chimed for the first time. (The clock itself had been keeping time since May 31.)

On this date:

In 1767, John Quincy Adams, the sixth president of the United States, was born in Braintree, Mass.

Guy Fawkes muses to himself—Adams’ five predecessors pretty well defined the “Early National” phase of U.S. History—Washington, Adams, Jefferson, Madison, and Monroe.  Adams himself represented a failed cultural and political movement in the U.S., as well a distinctly “minority” position on religion.  Adams was the last President to belong to the upper-class/aristocratic/ pseudo-monarchist Washington-Adams-Hamilton “Federalist” party and tradition, which by this time had been renamed or was being renamed “Whig”.  Adams was, I believe, also the last “New England Unitarian” to be President, although the Unitarian movement continued important from Philadelphia and points north for several decades.   Adams favored a National Bank of the United States, which put him seriously ad odds with his successor Andrew Jackson, who reviled the National Bank and ultimately destroyed it, acting by and through his Attorney General Roger B. Taney, who was rewarded by his role in the “Bank War” as well as his role in the Southeastern Indian Removal (aka the Cherokee, Creek, Chickasaw, and Choctaw “Trail of Tears”), by appointment as Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court.  Taney was later to write the only U.S. Supreme Court decision ever to result in war and require three constitutional amendments and over a hundred years of civil rights conflict to be overturned.

In 1798, the U.S. Marine Corps was formally re-established by a congressional act that also created the U.S. Marine Band.

In 1804, Vice President Aaron Burr mortally wounded former Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton during a pistol duel in Weehawken, N.J.

There is nothing good that can be said about this historical tragedy.  For one thing, it ultimately led to dueling being outlawed almost everywhere in the United States.   Andrew Hamilton was the greatest genius of the Federalist movement and party in the U.S.

In 1864, Confederate forces led by Gen. Jubal Early began an abortive invasion of Washington, turning back the next day.

In 1934, President Franklin D. Roosevelt became the first incumbent chief executive to travel through the Panama Canal.

In 1952, the Republican national convention, meeting in Chicago, nominated Dwight D. Eisenhower for president and Richard M. Nixon for vice president.

In 1955, the U.S. Air Force Academy swore in its first class of cadets at its temporary quarters, Lowry Air Force Base in Colorado.

In 1978, 216 people were immediately killed when a tanker truck overfilled with propylene gas exploded on a coastal highway south of Tarragona, Spain.

In 1979, the abandoned U.S. space station Skylab made a spectacular return to Earth, burning up in the atmosphere and showering debris over the Indian Ocean and Australia.

In 1989, actor and director Laurence Olivier died in Steyning, West Sussex, England, at age 82.

Ten years ago: A U.S. Air Force cargo jet, braving Antarctic winter, swept down over the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Research Center to drop off emergency medical supplies for Dr. Jerri Nielsen, a physician at the center who had discovered a lump in her breast.

Five years ago: Japan’s largest opposition party experienced strong gains in upper house elections, while Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi and his Liberal Democratic Party-led ruling bloc held on to a majority. The International AIDS Conference opened in Bangkok, with U.N. chief Kofi Annan challenging world leaders to do more to combat the raging global epidemic. Joe Gold, the founder of the original Gold’s Gym in 1965, died in Los Angeles at age 82.

One year ago: Oil prices reached a record high of $147.27 a barrel. IndyMac Bank’s assets were seized by federal regulators. A North Korean soldier fatally shot a South Korean tourist at a northern mountain resort, further straining relations between the two Koreas. Dr. Michael E. DeBakey, the cardiovascular surgeon who pioneered such procedures as bypass surgery, died in Houston at 99.

Today’s Birthdays: Actor Tab Hunter is 78. Actress Susan Seaforth Hayes is 66. Singer Jeff Hanna (Nitty Gritty Dirt Band) is 62. Ventriloquist- actor Jay Johnson is 60.

Actor Bruce McGill is 59. Singer Bonnie Pointer is 59. Actor Stephen Lang is 57. Actress Mindy Sterling is 56. Actress Sela Ward is 53. Reggae singer Michael Rose (Black Uhuru) is 52. Singer Peter Murphy is 52. Actor Mark Lester is 51. Jazz musician Kirk Whalum is 51. Singer Suzanne Vega is 50. Guitarist Richie Sambora (Bon Jovi) is 50.

Actress Lisa Rinna is 46. Rock musician Scott Shriner (Weezer) is 44. Actress Debbe Dunning is 43. Actor Gred Grunberg is 43.

Wildlife expert Jeff Corwin is 42. Actor Justin Chambers is 39. Actor Michael Rosenbaum is 37. Pop-rock singer Andrew Bird is 36. Country singer Scotty Emerick is 36. Rapper Lil’ Kim is 34. Rock singer Ben Gibbard is 33.

Rapper Lil’ Zane is 27. Washington Redskins tight end Chris Cooley is 27. Pop-jazz singer-musician Peter Cincotti is 26. Actor David Henrie is 20.

Thought for Today: “Living is strife and torment, disappointment and love and sacrifice, golden sunsets and black storms. I said that some time ago, and today I do not think I would add one word.” Sir Laurence Olivier, English actor-director (1907-1989).