Tag Archives: KKK

Rick Tyler on the Threats of Negative Symbolism in a Free Society

» Dealing With the Swastika and the KKK | Tyler for Congress

Source: Dealing With the Swastika and the KKK

Gentry’s Critique of Beyoncé: Yes, indeed: what if they HAD flown the Confederate Flag at the Superbowl? (I might have watched, for one thing)….

Listen to some profound words of truth and fairness by a VERY smart guy:

https://www.facebook.com/johnathan.gentry.14/videos/10208392172711669

Anyone who knows me even slightly would know that I’d rather have four root canals than watch a professional football game all the way through (all four quarters). I have hated the fanaticism of football religion ever since I was a kid. And I do mean both “World” Football and American Football. But Super Bowl? It actually inspired me to work on the Sabbath just to separate myself from the television glued crowd. I consider Football worship to be one of the ultimate and worst forms of degenerate depravity in the service of the collapse of Western Civilization, and insult to Christianity, a glorification of money and sex and non-European peoples…. and this is just the beginning of what I think of Football and Super Bowl Sunday. I’d say that football is exactly one-notch up from pro-rape rap music.

Karen Delcourt Kachar
Karen Delcourt Kachar Whoa!
Unlike · Reply · 1 · February 7 at 8:04pm
Jeff Crow
Jeff Crow Wow! I take it u feel passionately about this topic. lol

I sort of hear ya on that…but remember, football was created by the opposite groups you’re upset about. And the greatest teams are still from the 70’s-90’s as are the greatest players. It’s th…See More
Like · Reply · 1 · February 7 at 9:26pm
Charles Edward Lincoln
Charles Edward Lincoln I was a kid in the 1960s, becoming a teenager in the 1970s, in Dallas, and so I remember Tom Landry and the Dallas Cowboys very well. But I saw then what I see now: obsession with sports has replaced Church on Sunday (did you know that most Church services in the 16th-19th centuries began in the afternoon, and sometimes lasted three to four hours? The Germans were the ones who took it the farthest, preaching from 10-4….

Talk about a sacrilegious impossibility now… I feel like this is parallel to a discussion one might have about Neo-Con vs. Palaeoconservative Ideology. 1970s football of the era of Nixon and Kissinger and Reagan….being the Neocons…. Organized sports originated and developed almost simultaneously with Big Corporations in America and England.

The concept of team playing is psychologically consistent with corporate suppression of individual as opposed to group enterprise.

The first “teams” were rowing teams at Harvard and Yale in the 1840s. I confess I did some rowing in my Ivy years…. Good arm exercise, I miss it…

But PROFESSIONAL SPORTS didn’t really come into vogue until the late 19th Century—the Robber Baron Era—Fed by Government Contracts and Subsidies like gigantic land grants and resource “Concessions”…. monopolies in other words….

And professional football was a creature of the 1950s—the birth of television, the heyday of Madison Avenue advertising. The football franchises and leagues…. all creatures of the televised world, all intimately evolved with advertising and taking the minds and leisure hours away from thinking about God and positive politics or social conscience—Public Issues—Professional Sports are a creature of Consumerist Society—Re-read Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World….

Man…. I do feel passionately about this issue.

Sports ARE ten times the Opiate of the Masses—Religion inspires people (sometimes) to behave in a moral way and do very good things. Sports from the Golden Era of the 1970s-1990s you’re talking inspired O.J. Simpson to get an A-grade model beauty for his white wife and then kill her….. and get acquitted of murder on the criminal charges anyhow….

Professional Sports was part of the master plan to integrate society in the 1950s and break down the race barrier, to degrade women as mere sex objects (cheer leaders, “pseudo prostitutes” as Joss Whedon had one of his characters say in an early season of “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” in the 1990s).

The salaries paid professional sports stars is one of the sources of false dreaming in the U.S.—- people want something for nothing, every guy wants to be a multi-millionaire football star, every girl wants to be a Kardashian hanging out with one….

So do you think I’m wrong about any of these perspectives? If so, tell me…
Like · Reply · Yesterday at 12:38am · Edited
Charles Edward Lincoln

Jonathan Whiting
Jonathan Whiting Southern men would rather go home and watch a football game than work to regain our Soveriegnty from the U.S. Government. This is why we are not free.
Unlike · Reply · 3 · Yesterday at 12:02am
Charles Edward Lincoln
Charles Edward Lincoln I tend to think that was the PURPOSE of football—Sundays used to be a day to reflect on right and wrong, on the difference between good and evil in private and public life. Now it’s a day for men to chug beer and wish they had million dollar salaries which require no thinking….and get them laid twenty times a day if they are so inclined…..

AMERICANS ARE DOCILE IN THE FACE OF DECLINE—they still consume a surfeit of too much booze and TV news, too much steak and chocolate cake”….and drinking purple Koolaid….

For many years, a staple feature of the Venice Boardwalk in Los Angeles was a tall grey-haired black-man on roller skates with an electric guitar and power pack strapped to his back.  I have no idea whether this was his real name, but he was generally known as “Harry Perry, The Kama Kosmic Krusader” (that would be “KKK” wouldn’t it?  strange initials for a black guy….maybe… maybe not).  But one of “Harry Perry’s” more memorable songs was about the degeneracy of American White Middle Class people, and I can only say this old African American hit the nail right on the head, when he sang about the WASPS in the suburbans taking in a surfeit of soft life: “TOO MUCH BOOZE AND TV NEWS, TOO MUCH STEAK AND CHOCOLATE CAKE.”  Now Yahoo echoes this reality with a not-so-amusing, in fact deeply depressing, take on the same story:

The rich can stop worrying about a middle-class revolution
By Rick Newman
June 27, 2014 11:18 AM
Daily Ticker

A stagnant economy has undoubtedly put a lot of financial stress on the middle class. And that is bumming out America’s 1 percenters. “Our country is rapidly becoming less a capitalist society and more a feudal society,” entrepreneur Nick Hanauer wrote recently in Politico, in an open letter to “my fellow zillionaires.”

Hanauer — an early investor in Amazon (AMZN) who says he has been involved with more than 30 startups — cites the well-documented rise in income inequality during the past 30 years as the ultimate cause of a Mad Maxian dystopia he envisions. “If we don’t do something to fix the glaring inequities in this economy, the pitchforks are going to come for us,” he writes. “One day, somebody sets himself on fire, then thousands of people are in the streets, and before you know it, the country is burning. And then there’s no time for us to get to the airport and jump on our Gulfstream Vs and fly to New Zealand.”

He’s not the only wealthy worrier. Venture capitalist Tom Perkins complained earlier this year about the “persecution” of the rich through high taxes, while magnates such as Sam Zell, Wilbur Ross and John Mack have griped of late about the unschooled masses scapegoating America’s moneyed elite.

Chill out, rich folks

The rich ought to chill out. While the masses may envy their wealth, there’s no evidence of a revolution brewing, or even a well-behaved civil disturbance. Americans are clearly dismayed at the direction the country seems to be heading, but they are also docile in the face of decline and confused about possible solutions. Hanauer fears mobs heading for the castles of Greenwich and Palo Alto, but America’s disaffected these days are more likely to vent their rage behind closed doors as they shake their fists at Fox News or MSNBC and leave cranky comments on websites such as this one. If there’s a populist threat to the plutocrats, it’s years or even decades away.

Here’s the proof: Before the pitchforks, there will be higher taxes on the wealthy — yet there’s meager support for more redistribution of wealth. Polls show that slightly more than half of Americans favor raising taxes on the wealthy for specific causes such as helping reduce poverty, which makes it sound like tax hikes have widespread support and are inevitable. But here’s the catch: An even higher portion of Americans are disgusted with the government, with little trust that it spends tax money wisely. That’s why Republicans can consistently block tax hikes on the wealthy with little payback at the voting booth.

If there’s simmering outrage at this state of affairs, it’s not evident in the public square. The “Occupy” movement against the financial elite enjoyed a moment in 2011 but has largely fizzled. Hanauer argues that the occupiers helped sharpen the focus on income inequality, but The Tea Party is probably a more lasting phenomenon. And the Tea Party’s gripes about the wealthy are limited to corporate welfare and crony capitalism that puts government bureaucracy at the service of the rich. As for wealth and income inequality, the Tea Party generally takes a laissez-faire, free-market view: Those who can get rich, should.

Labor unions have represented the workingman’s concerns for a century, but they’re on the wane, too. Union membership has been in steady decline for at least 30 years, with no rebound on the horizon. The United Auto Workers couldn’t unionize a Volkswagen plant in Tennessee earlier this year, even with the tacit support of the company itself. Michigan became a “right to work” state in 2013, diminishing the power of unions in their own backyard.

More power for the wealthy

The Supreme Court, meanwhile, has enhanced the power of the rich through two decisions during the past several years that have eviscerated limits on campaign donations to political causes and candidates, which favors those with millions to spend to influence election outcomes. Two well-regarded academics, Martin Gilens of Princeton University and Benjamin I. Page of Northwestern University, argued in a recent paper that economic elites have gained so much power that “America’s claims to being a democratic society are seriously threatened.”

Hanauer sounds more like President Obama than a self-important plutocrat when he suggests ways to even out the wealth and income gaps. He favors a minimum wage of $15 per hour and chides wealthy business owners who feel they, rather than their customers, make the economy hum. “We rich people … have convinced ourselves that we are the main job creators,” he writes. “It’s simply not true. There can never be enough superrich Americans to power a great economy.”

Most economists would agree with that, but Hanauer risks hyping the consequences of a growing wealth gap when he warns that “revolutions, like bankruptcies, come gradually, and then suddenly.” That may be true in repressed states that don’t allow ordinary people to express their frustrations. But in functioning democracies (and even in the United States), there’s plenty of warning when social unrest is percolating. These days, all you have to do is read the blogs and follow the right Twitter (TWTR) accounts. If you do, you’ll encounter plenty of angst — but not much revolutionary zeal.

The economic trends Hanauer identifies are, in fact, real problems. America as a whole will suffer if the fortunes of the middle class don’t improve. There are solutions, however, and they’ll probably materialize in the usual American way — right before disaster strikes. It’s nearly inevitable there will be government spending cuts and, yes, tax hikes, when the government’s finances become unsustainable, which could take a decade or more. When it happens, the politicians in Washington will find ways to spread the pain around and America will muddle through. The rich will have to pay more, but they’ll still be rich. And they still won’t have to worry about pitchforks.

Rick Newman’s latest book is Rebounders: How Winners Pivot From Setback To Success. Follow him on Twitter: @rickjnewman.

http://finance.yahoo.com/blogs/daily-ticker/why-the-rich-are–mistakenly–worried-about-the-middle-class-151842954.html;_ylt=A0SO8zMCuLBTO2MA2ktXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTB0MGpwODQ0BHNlYwNzYwRjb2xvA2dxMQR2dGlkA1ZJUDM2NV8x