Tag Archives: Loyola Law School

New Orleans’ Top Federal Lawman came here to Confiscate Guns in Louisiana, and to change the psychology of the people…. and to go to schools to ask children to sign a Pledge to inform on their parents and friends who have guns…..

(1) Night before last, Wednesday, 9 October, for the second time I attended a lecture in a lecture series “Voices of Hope” at Trinity Episcopal Church at 1329 Jackson Avenue in New Orleans, about five blocks from where I’ve been living since March 8 of this year.  The program for last night had not been announced in advance (apparently for security reasons), but last week I attended a presentation by Clancy DuBos, political editor for the New Orleans Gambit and it was just interesting enough that I wanted to follow up, especially given the delights of the children’s choir at the 5:30 Wednesday Eucharist and the Wednesday dinner that follows.  (Mr. Dubo’s great message of hope for the people of New Orleans on October 2 was that the city’s two biggest problems were, “Crime and Keeping Water out of the City”; he apparently spent 40 years as an alternative press journalist to reach this conclusion…..but curiously, it was a fairly good lead in to the October 9 presentation)
(2) Kenneth A. Polite, Jr., is a good-looking, articulate, very “polite”, and friendly African American lawyer of impeccable establishment (Eastern Seaboard) credentials who claims (at 37) to be the second youngest U.S. Attorney currently serving in the United States.  He as born in New Orleans in 1976 when I was a Freshman/rising Sophomore at the College of Arts & Sciences at Tulane and attended De la Salle High School uptown on St. Charles—a world away, as he said, from the world into which he was born and raised “mostly” by his mother.  13 years after I graduated Tulane in 1980, K.A. Polite followed the common path of so many of the best and brightest everywhere from De la Salle in 70118 to Harvard 02138, where he graduated in 1997, and then attended Georgetown U. Law Center, where he received his J.D. in 2000 after editing an American Criminal Law Review.  Since then he has served with several major law firms in Delaware, New York, and New Orleans, in addition to serving for three years as an Assistant U.S. Attorney in New York 2007-2010. He was interested in criminal law and “gun violence” from childhood, because his father was a New Orleans (NOPD Second Police District, 4317 Magazine Street Across from Casamento’s Restaurant, right by St. George’s Episcopal School) police officer and, perhaps more significantly because his older brother was killed in a street gunfight in New Orleans when Kenneth was a teenager.
(3) Kenneth A. Polite, Jr., (do people just naturally conform to their surnames, like the long-time Yale archaeologist “Frank Hole”, the distinguished New York Court of Appeals Judge “Learned Hand”, the New Orleans Civil Rights Enforcer “John Minor Wisdom”, or my stodgy Trust officer, after my grandfather’s death, when I was in my first and second years at Harvard, “James Dullworth?”), Kenneth A. Polite, Jr., defines his primary mission in the 13 Parishes of the Eastern District of Louisiana as “to stop Gun Violence, and that means disarming the most heavily armed state in the union”, and specifically to overcome and invalidate Louisiana Amendment 2, which passed last year with 74% of the popular vote, and guaranteed “Strict Scrutiny” for any and all restrictions on the right to keep and bear arms.  Amendment 2 gave Louisiana gun-owners the strongest possession rights of any state, and Judge Darryl Derbigny, a fellow-Tulanian undergraduate (Columbia Law School, who formerly taught at Loyola Law school next door to Tulane) and self-described “Cajun-Jeffersonian” black Judge in New Orleans, ruled on March 25 of this year that the protection even extends to convicted felons who have served their time and been released, invalidating one of the particularly discriminatory aspects of gun control laws, which is that, once charged with (never mind convicted of) any felony, or any crime of “domestic violence”, no matter what the nature of the crime, a person loses his Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms FOREVER, not subject to restoration except by special Presidential or Gubernatorial order (under the Executive Pardon Power).  
(4) Kenneth A. Polite, Jr., made sure to specify that the arrest and conviction of all beneficiaries of Louisiana Amendment 2 was among his top priorities, but far beyond that, that he wanted to “stamp out the culture of guns” in Louisiana “once and forever, because this state is too dangerous.”  
(5) “The Louisiana Courts’ exemption for convicted Felons is subordinate to Federal Law and must not be allowed to prevail, and I have directed the 55 attorneys under my direction to use the full extent of our prosecutorial discretion to make this one of the top priorities of our enforcement program.  Saving lives by confiscating guns is more important than any other of the four pillars of justice to the justice department program.  This is part of the war on terrorism, this is part of the war for helpless victims, this is part of remaking America.”
(6) To my mind, one of the more amazing proposals Kenneth A. Polite, Jr., ever so politely made was effectively to enroll every child as a Federal agent against guns. “We want to implement here the program started in South Carolina schools, and that’s the second most heavily armed state in the Union, where we ask every High School Student to sign a detailed pledge and promise to report all gun ownership, whether it’s their friends or family, to the U.S. Attorney’s Office, and to reward those who participate in this program.  There will be age-appropriate simplified versions of the pledge for Middle and Elementary School students because we simply cannot afford to leave any stone unturned in emptying our streets and homes of the guns that killed my brother and kill 41 people every day in America.  That means that every 100 days, more people die of gun violence than died on 911, so yes, this is about fighting terrorism as our first priority in the United States, of making this country safe and secure in every way.”
(7) I am reminded of the “alternative history” movie “Fatherland” where a “Good Nazi” and officer of the SS discovers evidence of mass murder and seeks to defect to the United States to report it, but is reported to the Gestapo and murdered when his very young son follows his schools’ directives and reports his father’s activities as evidence of “mental illness.”  Of course, the use of child informers and reporters is well-documented in the former Soviet Union, by the East German STASI, and throughout the “Cultural Revolution” until today in the People’s Republic of (Red) China.
(8) During the comments period, several members of the audience approvingly commented on the need to psychologically manipulate children and otherwise “treat the psychopathy of guns”.  “There is too much prestige and pride associated with gun ownership and gun use” said one, “we clearly aim at education to turn that around” said Kenneth A. Polite, “we have to develop alternative sanctions to jail, jail is one of the places where the culture of gun use and gun violence is taught among the inmates and passed on from generation to generation; the cycle needs to stop.”
(9) One member of the audience, a psychologist from Santa Barbara, California, recently moved to New Orleans, made a fairly extensive statement about the biological predisposition that can be detected even in small children to the psychopathy of the gun culture and how simple tests should be administered to determine who is “at risk” and to treat these “pre-criminals” to avoid future crimes, to reorient their psychological framework and cultural ideology.  The new U.S. Attorney, Mr. Polite, shook this fellow’s hand afterwards and agreed to meet him “very soon” in his office downtown.
(10) I spoke to Mr. Polite after the meeting and asked him about corruption and in particular the massive foreclosure fraud committed by the banks.  Mr. Polite once again mentioned “prosecutorial discretion” and said that yes, “many desperate people faced with foreclosure have resorted to scams and alternative, illegal programs of resisting foreclosures and that this was a major target of the Justice Department White Collar Crime program Nationwide… It is really terrible when you see people resorting to crime to save their homes, it is so sad.”  I pressed him about the Banks fraud, fraud in the financial service sector and he said that obviously when such issues came up they would be investigated, but that gun related crime took priority over the relatively minor and rare issues of bank and financial institution fraud, “We saw a lot of that when I was an AUSA in New York, but I haven’t heard that’s much of an issue down here,” he said, “our priority is to keep people alive by rooting out gun violence and that means disarming this state and ending the iconic cultural status that guns have in our population; I dream of a gun-free Louisiana, where only law enforcement will ever be able to use deadly force.”
(11)  Kenneth A. Polite, Jr., presents a fine picture and articulate eloquence to the Upper and Upper Middle Class Audience at Trinity, built in 1847 and so the oldest standing Episcopal Church in the entire Louisiana territory purchased from France in 1803 (Christ Church Cathedral, although the congregation was founded in 1805, is housed in a gothic revival Church building begun in the 1880s, and Trinity in Natchitoches, the Second oldest standing Episcopal Church, where my grandmother Helen was baptized and once served as organist, was built in the 1850s).  The audience in Bishop Leonidas Polk Hall (named after Confederate General and Martyr General Leonidas Polk, the First Bishop of Louisiana) was 95% white, with Black maids, nurses, and companions to the elderly constituting the sole representatives of Mr. Polite’s race.  The one black lady to participate in the discussion period questioning complained that her brother was trying to have her “interdicted” (the Louisiana Civil Law Equivalent of civil commitment for mental incompetence)(she had to leave shortly thereafter because it “was her mistress’ bedtime”).  
(12) Upper Class White people fear crime.  White people fear being shot.  Father Mitch Smith described his time in the hospital over the past 8 months visiting a member of the parish perpetually hospitalized after being shot while gardening just a few blocks from Church.  Upper Class White people meeting in Leonidas Polk Hall may not realize the irony of their endorsement of governmental programs of gun confiscation.  The Second Amendment, prior to 1861, was a sure guarantor of the right of the Southern People to Secede, but since the Second Amendment did not carry with it a corresponding duty to keep and manufacture cannons in each state, the South was “outgunned” and ultimately (as Father Mitch recalled) led to the martyrdom of His Grace, General Polk).  
(13) I have previously written about my discussions with New Orleans policemen about the Second Amendment.  Their ambition is to “make sure we are not outgunned.”  Should the people or the Police hold the balance of Power?  In New Orleans and Louisiana, at the present time, there is widespread governmental fear that the government is outgunned in this state, and that the people hold the balance of power.  It is a “clear and present danger” to Federal Supremacy that Kenneth A. Polite, Jr., has come back to his hometown to wipe out forever.
 

Charles Edward Lincoln, III

“Ich bin der Geist der stets verneint, und das mit recht

Matthew 10:34-39
Think not that I am come to send peace on earth: I came not to send peace, but a sword. For I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law. And a man’s foes shall be they of his own household.
He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me. And he that taketh not his cross, and followeth after me, is not worthy of me. He that findeth his life shall lose it: and he that loseth his life for my sake shall find it.