Tag Archives: New York TImes

Camille Paglia, philosophical heroine to left and right, on why Trump is Now and NYT is Yesterday!

I have always admired Camille Paglia as a unique intellectual heroine, dear to the hearts and souls of the deeper intellectuals of both the right and the left.  Here is her latest on Salon.com, which I used to read just for her and Glenn Edward Greenwald. As an aside, when I say “used to” I mean ten years ago or more, back to Salon’s origins in 1995-2005 when I was a devoted subscriber and sometime comment and letter contributor: but Salon has deteriorated and degenerated.  It is not not just unAmerican but Anti-American.  Most of what appears on the pages or screens of Salon.com these days is so offensive and vile…. so blatantly unthinkingly OBOTOID (in support of the 44th) anti-white racist and pro-communist, I hardly ever look at it: BUT CAMILLE NEVER DISAPPOINTS, and I have been following her since she wrote for a literary magazine now defunct based in Austin, Texas—whose name I can’t even remember right now…

THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2016 05:00 AM CDT
Camille Paglia:

PC feminists misfire again, as fearful elite media can’t touch Donald Trump
A boastful, millionaire New Yorker liked the company of beautiful women? This is why NYT can’t lay a glove on Trump
CAMILLE PAGLIA
TOPICS: CAMILLE PAGLIA, DONALD TRUMP, EDITOR’S PICKS, ELECTIONS 2016, FEMINISM, MADONNA, MEDIA CRITICISM, MUSIC, NEW YORK TIMES, POLITICAL CORRECTNESS, INNOVATION NEWS, SUSTAINABILITY NEWS, TECHNOLOGY NEWS, LIFE NEWS, NEWS, POLITICS NEWS

Camille Paglia: PC feminists misfire again, as fearful elite media can’t touch Donald Trump
(Credit: AP)
Zap! If momentum were a surge of electromagnetic energy, Donald Trump against all odds has it now. The appalled GOP voters he is losing seem overwhelmed in number by independents and crossover Democrats increasingly attracted by his bumptious, raucous, smash-the-cucumber-frames style. While it’s both riveting and exhilarating to watch a fossilized American political party being blown up and remade, it’s also highly worrisome that a man with no prior political experience and little perceptible patience for serious study seems on a fast track to the White House. In a powder-keg world, erratic impulsiveness is far down the list of optimal presidential traits.

But the Democratic strategists who prophesy a Hillary landslide over Trump are blowing smoke. Hillary is a stodgily predictable product of the voluminous briefing books handed to her by a vast palace staff of researchers and pollsters—a staggeringly expensive luxury not enjoyed by her frugal, unmaterialistic opponent, Bernie Sanders (my candidate). Trump, in contrast, is his own publicist, a quick-draw scrapper and go-for-the-jugular brawler. He is a master of the unexpected (as the Egyptian commander Achillas calls Julius Caesar in the Liz Taylor Cleopatra). The massive size of Hillary’s imperialist operation makes her seem slow and heavy. Trump is like a raffish buccaneer, leaping about the rigging like the breezy Douglas Fairbanks or Errol Flynn, while Hillary is the stiff, sequestered admiral of a bullion-laden armada of Spanish galleons, a low-in-the-water easy mark as they creak and sway amid the rolling swells.

The drums had been beating for weeks about a major New York Times expose in the works that would demolish Trump once and for all by revealing his sordid lifetime of misogyny. When it finally appeared as a splashy front-page story this past Sunday (originally titled “Crossing the Line: Trump’s Private Conduct with Women”), I was off in the woods pursuing my Native American research. On Monday, after seeing countless exultant references to this virtuoso takedown, I finally read the article—and laughed out loud throughout. Can there be any finer demonstration of the insularity and mediocrity of today’s Manhattan prestige media? Wow, millionaire workaholic Donald Trump chased young, beautiful, willing women and liked to boast about it. Jail him now! Meanwhile, the New York Times remains mute about Bill Clinton’s long record of crude groping and grosser assaults—not one example of which could be found to taint Trump.

Blame for this fiasco falls squarely upon the New York Times editors who delegated to two far too young journalists, Michael Barbaro and Megan Twohey, the complex task of probing the glitzy, exhibitionistic world of late-twentieth-century beauty pageants, gambling casinos, strip clubs, and luxury resorts. Neither Barbaro, a 2002 graduate of Yale, nor Twohey, a 1998 graduate of Georgetown University, had any frame of reference for sexual analysis aside from the rote political correctness that has saturated elite American campuses for nearly 40 years. Their prim, priggish formulations in this awkwardly disconnected article demonstrate the embarrassing lack of sophistication that passes for theoretical expertise among their over-paid and under-educated professors.

When I saw the reporters’ defensive interview on Monday with CNN anchors Kate Bolduan and John Berman, I felt sorry for the earnest, owlish Barbaro, who seems like a nice fellow who has simply wandered out of his depth. But Twohey, with her snippy, bright and shiny careerism, took a page from the slippery Hillary playbook in the way she blatheringly evaded any direct answer to a pointed question about how Rowanne Brewer Lane’s pleasantly flirtatious first meeting with Trump at a crowded 1990 pool party at Mar-a-Lago ended up being called “a debasing face-to-face encounter” in the Times. The hidden agenda of advocacy journalism has rarely been caught so red-handed.

The supreme irony of the Times’ vacuous coverage is that the early 1990s banquet-hall photograph of the unmarried Rowanne Brewer and Donald Trump illustrating it is the sexiest picture published in the mainstream media in years. Not since Melissa Forde’s brilliant 2012 Instagram portraits of a pensive Rihanna smoking a cigarillo as she lounged half-nude in a fur-trimmed parka next to a fireplace have I seen anything so charismatically sensual.

Small and blurry in the print edition, the Brewer-Trump photo in online digital format positively pops with you-are-there luminosity. Her midnight-blue evening dress opulently cradling her bare shoulders, Rowanne is all flowing, glossy hair, ample, cascading bosom, and radiant, lushly crimson Rita Hayworth smile. The hovering Trump, bedecked with the phallic tongue of a violet Celtic floral tie, is in Viking mode, looking like a triumphant dragon on the thrusting prow of a long boat. “To the victor belong the spoils!” I said to myself in admiration, as seductive images from Babylon to Paris flashed through my mind. Yes, here is all the sizzling glory of hormonal sex differentiation, which the grim commissars of campus gender studies will never wipe out!

Hey, none of this should make Trump president. But I applaud this accidental contribution by the blundering New York Times to the visual archive of modern sex. We’ve been in a long, dry-gulch period of dully politicized sex, which is now sputtering out into round-the-clock crusades for transgender bathrooms—knuckle-rapping morality repackaged as hygiene. An entire generation has been born and raised since the last big epiphany of molten on-screen sexuality—Sharon Stone’s epochal and ravishingly enigmatic performance in Basic Instinct (1992). Maybe we need Trump the movie mogul most of all. Forget all that Capitol Hill and Foggy Bottom tsuris—let’s steer Trump to Hollywood!

*

Dear Camille,

This was a minor point in your essay on “Free Speech and the Modern Campus,” but your comments on the National Museum of the American Indian really struck a chord with me, and I wanted to thank you, since I never saw any appropriately awful reviews.

I visited not long after it opened, in anticipation of seeing an organized, well-structured tour through the cultures, languages, and religions that we have lost (the Smithsonian does a good job in other places!). Obviously, there was nothing but happy talk about how man and nature used to live in harmony, not a word wasted on the linguistic diversity that was lost in North America since 1600, and absolutely no thematic organization across the museum. I had the distinct impression that the curators thought that putting together a coherent program would have been one final, intolerable act of cultural imperialism!

How could you take such amazing ingredients and produce something so tasteless? It was like going to a nice restaurant in anticipation of a wonderful steak dinner and being served a picture of parsley. What a waste!

Chris Dyer
Assistant Professor, School of Computer Science
Carnegie Mellon University
Pittsburgh

I totally agree with you! As I said last month in the free speech lecture at Drexel University that you refer to, the beautifully designed National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. has been shockingly furnished like a tacky gift shop, devoid of scholarly substance and clarity of presentation. This is a major scandal that demonstrates the failure of parochial identity politics, which has so distorted American education and directly led to today’s plague of campus political correctness.

In the 1970s, when women’s studies, African-American studies, and Native American studies were hastily added to the curriculum by administrators under public relations pressure, those new programs were not coherently planned or structured in scholarly terms, so they became instantly vulnerable to highly politicized ideology that has limited their wider cultural impact over time. The tragic emptiness of the National Museum of the American Indian (whose major draw seems to be its multi-ethnic cafeteria) is one result of the ghettoization of Native American studies, which should have been incorporated into the broader, well-established fields of world anthropology and archaeology.

Sovereign Nation or USA Vassal-State? German Looks to its Future under the Obamanation of Global-Imperialist USA!: More European Commentary on the Free Trade Agreement that NO ONE is Discussing in the USA—Obama Promotes Trayvon Sympathy Race-Riots to Hide the Largest U.S. Imperialist Action in HIstory—the Virtual Annexation of Europe

Last week for Bastille Day, July 14, 2013, I published a quotation from the French Front National’s website concerning the leading French Nationalist Party’s fears of a free trade agreement that, so far, I have seen discussed NOWHERE in the US-Media—someone fill me in if they have seen NYT or WSJ reports on it, because I’ve looked and (if they are there) I’ve somehow missed it.  We obviously can not count, any longer, on these two traditional pillars of US Journalism.  This week, following up on the French Commentary about the “Wildfire of Savage Globalism” with and by which Obama as George Bush’s handpicked successor is attempting effectively to annex Europe, I now quote the German National Democratic Party’s fears of the complete abrogation of National Sovereignty for status as a U.S. Vassal State, a condition not experienced since the dismal days post 1945 when Germany was effectively partitioned four ways between Great Britain in the Northwest (Hamburg, Hannover, Bremen, Schleswig-Holstein, Wesphalia, and most of Rheinland-Phalz, France in the Southwest (Saarland, Baden-Wurtemburg, U. S. Central and Southeast (Bavaria up to and including Frankfurt-am-Main), and of course, the entire eastern half of the Country either annexed to Poland and obliterated from the map or the heartland stub of Berlin, Brandenburg, Thuringia, Saxony, and Mecklenberg-Schwerin as “East Germany” operating under Russian occupation for 45 years as a Soviet Vassal State).  Surely Germany has suffered enough from foreign domination!

My sight-translation from German is not the best of my foreign language skills (German-original text below), but this is the best I can do early on a Sunday morning before Church with no better stimulus than Arizona Southern Style Tea from a page just published on Friday July 19, 2013, on the National Democratic Party websitehttp://www.npd.de/html/1938/artikel/detail/3310/ I WOULD WELCOME ANY CORRECTIONS OR SUGGESTED CLARIFICATIONS OF MY TRANSLATION BELOW, my undergraduate German professors Starke & Gotzkowsky would be so disappointed in my ability 36-35 years later…

Sovereign German Nation State or US-Vassal>
German Future Against the Background of the Prism-Accord Provided by the “Free Trade” Agreement with the United States

One simply has to answer too many questions incompletely and insubstantially, because we simply have no answer from the United States regarding to the extent of the American spying on German citizens and politicians. More than two-thirds of the Germans are dissatisfied and unhappy with the information provided by the (German) federal government, which may have been enough for Angela Merkel on this topic that shows her failings dramatically.
However, the NPD will not allow this affirmation of the comprehensive loss any sovereignty to evaporate into the summer heat.  Because it is not only the privacy of millions of Germans citizens by US-espionage that is in danger, even the protection of German companies is no longer secure.
Given this background, it is important to consider the proposed free trade agreement between the EU and the United States must be reviewed.  A  “free trade agreement” in any case threatens the independent self-management of all member governments and their peoples.  “Free Trade” prohibits ordinary national protection mechanisms, import duties and other effective measures for consumer protection. The “winners” of this free trade area are only the large, internationally active corporations. [Translators note: look at what has happened in Mexico since NAFTA: the Blessings of Walmart have reached into every corner of the land, including World Patrimony sites like the ruins of the greatest pre-Aztec sacred city of Quetzalcoatl at Teotihuacan; yet has Mexico reaped a great harvest of jobs amidst the Yankee invasion?  No, the slave labor of China and sub-human wages of sub-continental India have undercut Mexico’s extremely low wages, meaning that American companies have taken their jobs NOT to Mexico primarily but elsewhere, as Free Trade permits them to do—the net loss of Sovereignty plus Wealth to Mexico has fueled the largest human migration in history across the Rio Grande, Gadsen Purchase line, and boundary of Upper-Lower California to the point where the US is effectively half-Mexican now and large parts of the Mexican population depend on the “foreign aid” provided by its US-resident citizens].  “Losers” are without exception the acquiescing states and their citizens.  The states lose, because for every protective measure they can be dragged into [effectively dominant-State-US controlled] free trade courts, and this means that the states are thereby forced largely to withdraw from economic regulation. The people lose, because consumers suffer from unsafe products [produced in non-consumer countries] and small businesses suffer from the ruinous competition from abroad [which competition] could not be more effectively protected.

So said the US-american political scientist Susan George: “winners are logically the large companies. Small and medium-sized companies obtain much less, if they are already subcontractors of the greater companies and so already exploited, they have no way to regulate their prices, which will fall.”
Horse meat scandals and worse were on the agenda, because the states have no regulatory power anymore. Consumer protection becomes a thing of the past. The GMO Biotech-Concern Monsanto announced just a few days ago, that it will make no further applications for legalisation of genetically modified food in Germany and Europe.  This is no wonder, since Monsanto and similar companies can calmly but soon via free trade agreements will export  their genetically modified products to Germany [against the will and choice of the German people]. Ms. George states, precisely: “In the US, with 80 percent of the maize [American corn] production genetically modified, multinational companies dominate. And in agriculture, then the price on the US market sets the international price. That would be the ruin of the Europeans, except for the large, industrial establishments in Europe.”

The current Prism-Accord, is now revealed in light of the comprehensive espionage of the US secret NSA [National Security Agency] service in Germany, [and] shos the planned free trade agreement in [at the very least] a questionable light. In the future, comprehensive industrial espionage in Germany and Europe would be even easier for the US secret services. Several studies have already shown that Germany would have the least benefit of such a free trade agreement.  The even more comprehensive industrial espionage imposed on Germany, on the other hand would probably bear the brunt. Our already docile and US vassal Politi-Puppets like Chancellor Angela Merkel and Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich provide no expectation of protection for German citizens, consumers or businesses. [Friedrich has shown this by the complete lack of vigor in his investigation of the NSA over the past week or so].
Neither the Prism-Accord nor the planned free trade agreement will disappear in the summer!  They must be an election issue!
The NPD is the only party in Germany for the restoration of the full sovereignty of the German nation-state, the guarantor of the ability of German policies and basic conditions for an effective protection of German citizens and businesses.

[all bracketed content added by yours truly, the shamefully poor-translator CEL III]

(ORIGINAL TEXT IN GERMAN, SAME PAGE NOTED ABOVE: http://www.npd.de/html/1938/artikel/detail/3310/)

19.07.2013

Soveräner deutscher Nationalstaat statt US-Vasall

Vor dem Hintergrund von Prism darf es mit den USA kein Freihandelsabkommen geben 

Viele Fragen musste sie mit völliger Substanzlosigkeit beantworten, weil sie schlicht und ergreifend von den USA bisher keine Antwort zum Ausmaß der Ausspähung deutscher Bürger und Politiker bekommen hat. Mehr als zwei Drittel der Deutschen sind mit der Aufklärungsarbeit der Bundesregierung unzufrieden, Grund genug für Merkel, daß Thema zu entdramatisieren.

Die NPD wird allerdings nicht zulassen, daß dieser Beleg des umfassenden Verlusts jeglicher Souveränität im Sommerloch verschwindet. Denn nicht nur die Privatsphäre von Millionen deutschen Bürgern ist durch die US-Spionage in Gefahr, auch der Schutz deutscher Unternehmen ist nicht mehr gewährleistet.

Vor diesem Hintergrund muß auch das geplante Freihandelsabkommen zwischen der EU und den USA betrachtet werden. Ein Freihandelsabkommen bedroht ohnehin die Handlungsfähigkeit der Staaten und Völker, verbietet es doch nationale Schutzmechanismen, Einfuhrzölle und wirksame Maßnahmen zum Verbraucherschutz. Gewinner einer solchen Freihandelszone wären einzig und allein die großen, international agierenden Konzerne. Verlierer wären die Staaten und deren Bürger. Erstere, weil sie wegen jeder Schutzmaßnahme vor Gericht gezerrt werden könnten, da der Freihandelsvertrag die Staaten zwingen würde, sich aus der Wirtschaftsregulierung weitgehend zurückzuziehen. Letztere, weil Verbraucher vor bedenklichen Produkten und kleine Unternehmen vor der ruinösen Konkurrenz aus dem Ausland nicht mehr wirksam geschützt werden könnten.

So sagte hierzu die US-amerikanische Politikwissenschaftlerin Susan George: „Gewinner sind logischerweise die großen Unternehmen. Kleine und mittelständische Unternehmen würden viel weniger davon haben, wenn sie Subunternehmer sind und bereits von den Großen ausgebeutet werden, die nicht regelmäßig zahlen, die die Preise drücken können.“

Pferdefleischskandale und Schlimmeres wären an der Tagesordnung, weil die Staaten über keinerlei Kontrollbefugnisse mehr verfügen würden. Verbraucherschutz würde der Vergangenheit angehören. Der Gentech-Konzern Monsanto hat erst vor wenigen Tagen bekannt gegeben, keine weiteren Anträge auf Legalisierung von genmanipulierten Lebensmitteln in Deutschland und Europa stellen zu wollen. Dies ist auch kein Wunder, können Monsanto und ähnliche Konzerne doch bald seelenruhig ihren Genmüll via Freihandelsabkommen nach Deutschland exportieren. George hierzu wörtlich: „In den USA macht Genmais 80 Prozent der Produktion aus, hier dominieren multinationale Unternehmen. Und in der Landwirtschaft, wird dann der Preis auf dem US-Markt zum internationalen Preis. Das wäre der Ruin der Europäer, außer für die großen, industriellen Betriebe in Europa.“

Auch die aktuelle Prism-Affäre, die die umfassende Spionage des US-Geheimdienstes NSA in Deutschland offengelegt hat, stellt das geplante Freihandelsabkommen in ein fragwürdiges Licht. Künftig wäre es für die US-Geheimdienste noch einfacher, umfassende Industriespionage in Deutschland und Europa zu betreiben. Mehrere Studien haben bereits ergeben, daß Deutschland von einem solchen Freihandelsabkommen ohnehin am wenigsten profitieren würde. Die noch umfassendere Industriespionage eingerechnet wäre Deutschland hingegen wohl sogar der Hauptleidtragende. Mit willfährigen und US-hörigen Polit-Marionetten wie Merkel und Friedrich ist auch kein Schutz deutscher Bürger, Verbraucher und Unternehmen zu erwarten.

Sowohl die Prism-Affäre als auch das geplante Freihandelsabkommen dürfen nicht im Sommerloch verschwinden! Sie müssen Wahlkampfthema werden!

Die NPD spricht sich als einzige Partei in Deutschland für die Wiederherstellung der umfassenden Souveränität des deutschen Nationalstaats aus, die Garant für die Handlungsfähigkeit der deutschen Politik und Grundbedingung für einen wirksamen Schutz deutscher Bürger und Unternehmen ist.

Deploring the Fourth of July—the Lost Spirit of ’76—Mourning the Death of Liberty on July 4, 1863 and 150 Years Later

http://tenthamendmentcenter.com/2013/07/03/uncelebrate-the-fourth/#.UdSY9RYTElI

It is no accident, coincidence or mistake that the Battles of Gettysburg and Vicksburg weigh so heavily on the American mind and consciousness.  On this day in 1863, if the Confederate States of America ever had any chance of winning its independence or achieving a newly restored constitutional synthesis in the USA, that chance died along with thousands of men, in both blue and grey, on the fields and rolling hills and ridges of Southern Pennsylvania and the bluffs of the Mississippi River and the Yazoo Basin.   I love the memory of the South and honor the legacy of my Confederate Ancestors, but the memory of the freedom that existed before 1861 is bittersweet indeed.   The modern world is a world of cruel, industrial slaughter and subjugation.   The spirt of the times was different, very different, as David Brooks recorded in yesterday’s New York Timeshttp://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/02/opinion/brooks-why-they-fought.html?_r=0.  The key point of Brooks’ article may be the final paragraph (it was a Christian nation and the warriors believed in God, and their covenant with the Almighty):

“These letter writers, and many of the men at Gettysburg, were not just different than most of us today because their language was more high flown and earnest. There was probably also a greater covenantal consciousness, a belief that they were born in a state of indebtedness to an ongoing project, and they would inevitably be called upon to pay these debts, to come square with the country, even at the cost of their lives.

Makes today’s special interest politics look kind of pathetic.”

Today, in the midst of our world of special interest politics (most fairly called the politics of distraction and inattention to real detail), e now have antibiotics, air-conditioning, and refrigeration, we can even choose our own favorite brand of tooth paste, and as a direct consequence of these technological matters we live longer.  But (to paraphrase Patrick Henry) is life so dear or peace so sweet that we would live it as slaves in chains?  Was freeing four million slaves from formal and open slavery paid for the occult and hermeneutic (but much more severe) total slavery of a nation of 300 million?  We awaken each day to television and internet broadcasts which divert our attention from real problems.   We live and sleep in a soft cocoon of dissimulated reality.

The Tenth Amendment Center’s article above refers to modern America’s 4th of July celebration as a lie, a major deception.  This ten year old article is surely correct, but Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg address, delivered later that year after the smoke of the battle had long blown off, was a much greater day of deception.  Old “Uncle Abe’s” carefully collected and assembled words amounted to the height of hypocrisy and disingenuous political manipulation.  Overlooking the graves of the thousands of fallen soldiers and the Constitution for which they fought, if you can manage in your mind merely but absolutely, to invert every line of the speech my distant kinsman gave in November 1863—you will see the reality, “A new nation conceived in tyranny and dedicated to the proposition that all men should equally be chattel slaves in bondage to their government”.   I read his cynical text with horror, trying to imagine what the reaction to his true purposes would have been, had he had the nerve to announce the true provisions of the new Constitution which he was creating by and through that horrible war.   

I am not at all sure that the authors of the Tenth Amendment society were specifically thinking about the 150th anniversary of Vicksburg and Gettysburg 10 years ago.  But I know I am thinking about mourning those calamities today.  The Spirit of 76 is all but dead.  The heirs of the Revolution have lost control of the country, and the reality is that the United States “conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal” was the country being buried at Gettysburg, and now almost forgotten.

I have often visited the Battlefield at Vicksburg but never been to Gettysburg.  I think I would find the latter much too emotional, in part because of my hatred of the falsity of the Gettysburg Address and what it implied.  Six of my ancestors fought there.  One was taken a prisoner.  None of my ancestors fought at Vicksburg or in the Western or Trans-Mississippi theatres of war at all.

General Lee lost at Gettysburg, but much more significantly, General Grant won at Vicksburg.  Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia only had one reasonable strategy and that was to Capture Washington, D.C., and make IT the new Capital of the Confederacy.  He and Jubal Early came so close on so many occasions, but they failed.  Lee’s victory would have been largely symbolic—the North could have continued the War without Washington, D.C., although the boost to Confederate prestige by occupying the capital city would have been enormous, both at home and abroad, internationally.  

And it was the lack of solid international recognition (specifically England’s and France’s refusal, in the aftermath of the Marxist led and inspired uprisings of 1848, to which both Queen Victoria’s and Emperor Napoleon III’s governments correctly connected Lincoln’s and the Republican Party’s rise) which doomed the Confederacy more than any other single factor in the war, aside from the north’s sheer brute strength, and genuine brutality.  

Yankee brutality was apparent nowhere more than in the six week siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi, by Ulysses S. Grant, which reduced the population, military and civilian, to eating rats before the riverside fortress-town’s defenders’ final surrender on July 4, 1863.  The skirmishes between Seminary ridge and Cemetery Ridge at Gettysburg suggested a kinder and gentler war, more humane and genteel, by comparison.  But on those two battlefields died the heart and soul of the American dream of liberty and freedom, never really to rise up again over the past 150 years.

Uncelebrating the Fourth

by  on July 3, 2013 in Featured 2

by Harry Browne, Originally written July 2003

Unfortunately, July 4th has become a day of deceit.

On July 4, 1776, the Continental Congress formally declared its independence from Great Britain. Thirteen years later, after a difficult war to secure that independence, the new country was open for business.

It was truly unique – the first nation in all of history in which the individual was considered more important than the government, and the government was tied down by a written Constitution.

It was the one nation where you could live your life secure in the knowledge that no one would ask for your papers, where you weren’t identified by a number, and where the government wouldn’t extort a percentage of your income as the price of holding a job.

And so each year July 4th has been a commemoration of the freest country in history.

False Celebration

But the America that’s celebrated no longer exists.

The holiday oratory deceitfully describes America as though it were the unique land of liberty that once was. Politicians thank the Almighty for conferring the blessings of liberty on a country that no longer enjoys those blessings. The original freedom and security have disappeared, even though the oratory lingers on.

What made America unique is now gone, and we are much the same as Germany, France, England, or Spain, with:

  • confiscatory taxes,
  • a Constitution and Bill of Rights that are symbolic only – merely documents used to justify governmental actions that are in fact prohibited by those documents,
  • business regulated by the state in the most minute detail,
  • no limits on what Congress or the President might decide to do.

Yes, there are some freedoms left, but nothing like the America that was and nothing that you can’t find in a few dozen other countries.

The Empire

Gone, too, is the sense of peace and security that once reigned throughout the land. America, bound by two huge oceans and two friendly neighbors – was subject to none of the never-ending wars and destruction that plagued Europe and Asia.

Now, however, everyone’s business is America’s business. Our Presidents consider themselves the rulers of the world – deciding who may govern any country on earth and sending Americans to die enforcing those decisions.

Whereas America was once an inspiration to the entire world – its very existence was proof that peace and liberty really were possible – Americans now live in fear of the rest of the world and the rest of the world lives in fear of America.

The Future

Because the education of our children was turned over to government in the 19th century, generations of Americans have been taught that freedom means taxes, regulations, civic duty, and responsibility for the whole world. They have no conception of the better life that could exist in a society in which government doesn’t manage health care, education, welfare, and business – and in which individuals are free to plot their own destinies.

Human beings are born with the desire to make their own decisions and control their own lives. But in most countries government and social pressures work to teach people to expect very little autonomy.

Fortunately, in America a remnant has kept alive the ideas of liberty, peace, and self-respect – passing the concepts on from generation to generation. And so today millions of Americans know that the present system isn’t the right system – that human beings aren’t born to serve the state and police the world.

Millions more would be receptive upon being shown that it’s possible to have better lives than what they’re living now.

Both groups need encouragement to quit supporting those who are taking freedom away from them.

Become a member and support the TAC!

You and I may not have the money and influence to change America by ourselves, but we can keep spreading the word – describing a better society in which individuals are truly free and government is in chains (instead of the opposite).

And someday we may reach the people who do have the money and influence to persuade tens of millions of Americans to change our country for the better.

I don’t know that it’s going to happen, but I do know it’s possible. I know that the urge to live one’s own life is as basic in human beings as the will to live and the desire to procreate. If we keep plugging away, we may eventually tap into that urge and rally the forces necessary to restore the real America.

And then the 4th of July will be worth celebrating again.

Harry Browne (RIP 1933-2006), the author of Why Government Doesn’t Work and many other books, was the Libertarian Party presidential candidate in 1996 and 2000, a co-founder of DownsizeDC, and the Director of Public Policy for the American Liberty Foundation.  See his website.

33 Years (and one week) was a Long Ice Age Lifetime—May 11, 1980 to May 18, 2013—has been 33 Years and One Week

According to my old professor of Biological Anthropology, Erik Trinkaus, from whom I took several of the most amazing courses I ever had during my graduate career, Ice Age Humans (Neanderthals or Cro-Magnons) in France, Europe, and the Near East did not typically live as long as I have to date (53 years).  In fact, life expectancies were probably less than 30 years for both males and females, and if we have more burial data from older individuals, it is because anyone who lived beyond 40 was practically a godlike object of ancestor worship (OK, that’s my embellishment, not anything Erik ever actually said.  But for what Erik Trinkaus’ “thumbnail” summary opinion was, see an article which cited him in the New York Times, just for a casual and basically random example: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/11/science/11obneanderthal.html?_r=0).

So it is with shock, awe, and dismay that I realize now that I graduated from the College of Arts & Sciences at Tulane University 33 years and one week ago as of May 18, 2013.  That day is also illuminated by the following historical trivia:

Saturday, May 18, 2013

On this date:

Montreal, Quebec, was founded in 1642

The Siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi, began in 1863

Plessy v. Fergusson was decided in 1896

Haley’s Comet Passed by the Earth in 1910

Franklin D. Roosevelt created the Tennessee Valley Authority in 1933

Apollo 10 blasted off in 1969

Mount St. Helens’ Volcano in Washington Exploded in 1980

I graduated from Tulane University on May 11, 1980, 33 years and 1 week ago today—Oh yeah, I guess I already mentioned that….

Montreal being founded was a good thing.  Montreal is a really nice city (lots of cute little French-Canadian girls up there, and the food is great too).   I hear Vicksburg was OK before the siege, but it got kind of boring afterwards.   As for the TVA—well, I have heard the TVA was such a success that they never dared to repeat it, which is just as well, because it was essentially just another Communist-Marxist-Stalinist 5 year plan that has now lasted 80 years…. Now that’s a REALLY long time for a 5 year plan to go on….. Aside from the Federal Reserve Banking System, the TVA is the United States Government’s largest “privately” owned corporation.  That is confusing, isn’t it: how can the U.S. Government own anything privately?  Well, the TVA is set up as a private corporation, it’s employees are not US Government employees, but it is wholly owned by the Government.  In other words, the TVA operates as even even more of a “private, closely held” corporation than (a) the Virginia Company, (b) the Massachusetts Bay Company, (c) the Hudson’s Bay Company, or (d) the British East India Company ever was until after the Sepoy Mutiny let to the annexation of India to the Crown as an “Empire.”  But the sole owner of the TVA is the U.S. Government, so it’s a private corporation owned by the largest and most powerful public entity (the U.S. Government) in the world.

Anyhow, I deeply resent the passage of time.   As “the Preacher, the son of David, King in Jerusalem” wrote in the Book of Ecclesiastes:

Vanity of vanities, saith the Preacher, vanity of vanities; all is vanity.

What profit hath a man of all his labour which he taketh under the sun?

One generation passeth away, and another generation cometh: but the earth abideth for ever.

The sun also ariseth, and the sun goeth down, and hasteth to his place where he arose.

The wind goeth toward the south, and turneth about unto the north; it whirleth about continually, and the wind returneth again according to his circuits.

All the rivers run into the sea; yet the sea is not full; unto the place from whence the rivers come, thither they return again.

All things are full of labour; man cannot utter it: the eye is not satisfied with seeing, nor the ear filled with hearing.

The thing that hath been, it is that which shall be; and that which is done is that which shall be done: and there is no new thing under the sun.

10 Is there any thing whereof it may be said, See, this is new? it hath been already of old time, which was before us.

11 There is no remembrance of former things; neither shall there be any remembrance of things that are to come with those that shall come after.

At least verse five gave Hemingway a good idea for a memorable title for one of his novels….some obscure travelogue about Spanish Bullfights in Pamplona.  I think there was a precociously slutty British socialite, a Rich American Jew, a War Veteran, a couple of drunken Scots, an underage Spanish Bullfighter who ends up with the aristocratic slut……

There’s also a holographic mirror at Antoine’s Restaurant in one of the private side rooms (in the New Orleans French Quarter on St. Louis) called “All is Vanity“—it’s a picture of an exquisitely beautiful young lady, probably a close relation of those French-Canadian girls from Montreal mentioned above, whose face when seen from a different angle turns into a rather frightening death’s head skeletal neck-on-shoulder with skull still in place.  And like unto that image, the inscription over so many rural Mexican cemeteries: “Aquí se Acaba el Orgullo Mundial” (Here Endeth Earthly Pride—compare also “Under the Volcano“—both the book and the movie).

As of the 33 years that have passed since my graduation Phi Beta Kappa, Magna cum Laude, from Tulane.  Well, “what profit” indeed have I to show for my labour?   I suppose I have learned a lot.  But have I put it to good use?  Continuing from the first Chapter of Ecclesiastes:

13 And I gave my heart to seek and search out by wisdom concerning all things that are done under heaven: this sore travail hath God given to the sons of man to be exercised therewith.

14 I have seen all the works that are done under the sun; and, behold, all is vanity and vexation of spirit.

15 That which is crooked cannot be made straight: and that which is wanting cannot be numbered.

16 I communed with mine own heart, saying, Lo, I am come to great estate, and have gotten more wisdom than all they that have been before me in Jerusalem: yea, my heart had great experience of wisdom and knowledge.

17 And I gave my heart to know wisdom, and to know madness and folly: I perceived that this also is vexation of spirit.

18 For in much wisdom is much grief: and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow

Have I accumulated a large estate?  No and No.  I suppose, in all honesty, thanks in large part to my failed marriage and related matters: I have BLOWN a large estate sky high.   That’s an accomplishment of sorts I guess, which certainly not everyone has had the opportunity to do.

I finished a doctoral dissertation at Harvard which was immediately accepted for publication but I didn’t get around to publishing it in a timely manner and now the Peabody Museum isn’t willing to publish it under the original terms as Peabody Memoir 20 unless I completely rewrite it and resubmit it and get it approved for publication.  In other words, essentially, if I do my doctoral research (why not my doctorate?) all over again.

At the end of my 52nd I got a chipped tooth and developed dental problems which remind me of the human osteology class I had with Erik Trinkaus, using Gray’s Anatomy  (the Classic Medical School Anatomy text and reference book, not the TV soft-porn prime-time soap opera series).   I developed this broken molar problem in New Orleans.  That’s the only saving grace.  I’m finally living back in my favorite city in the USA, albeit as something of a perpetual tourist rather than a real resident (at least I go to Church more regularly than most tourists who come here, I dare say).

And in that connexion, talking of Church, today was the Feast of the Pentecost, and I have to say I think that Christ Church Cathedral on St. Charles did a better job of making Pentecost memorable than I have ever seen anywhere.  They had red-ribbon banners and parasols (and/or Chinese lanterns) representing the tongues of fire through which the Holy Ghost entered the Apostles, giving them the ability to speak in tongues.  The Church was generally draped in Red, and since I was a very small child, Red has basically been my favorite colour (my exceedingly conservative grandmother Helen worried that I might turn out a communist—but I didn’t).

And the Psalm today I noticed on Thursday when I went to the mid-day mass on my first day back from Florida.  It was Psalm 104 and it was not appointed for Thursday, but for some reason I opened the Book of Common Prayer and fixated on that Psalm, and it was the Psalm for this beautiful Sunday Service after the reading from the Book of Acts concerning the first Pentacost and the first spontaneous translations of the Gospel by the Apostles….: 

104 Bless the Lord, O my soul. O Lord my God, thou art very great; thou art clothed with honour and majesty.

Who coverest thyself with light as with a garment: who stretchest out the heavens like a curtain:

Who layeth the beams of his chambers in the waters: who maketh the clouds his chariot: who walketh upon the wings of the wind:

Who maketh his angels spirits; his ministers a flaming fire:

Who laid the foundations of the earth, that it should not be removed for ever.

Thou coveredst it with the deep as with a garment: the waters stood above the mountains.

At thy rebuke they fled; at the voice of thy thunder they hasted away.

They go up by the mountains; they go down by the valleys unto the place which thou hast founded for them.

Thou hast set a bound that they may not pass over; that they turn not again to cover the earth.

10 He sendeth the springs into the valleys, which run among the hills.

11 They give drink to every beast of the field: the wild asses quench their thirst.

12 By them shall the fowls of the heaven have their habitation, which sing among the branches.

13 He watereth the hills from his chambers: the earth is satisfied with the fruit of thy works.

14 He causeth the grass to grow for the cattle, and herb for the service of man: that he may bring forth food out of the earth;

15 And wine that maketh glad the heart of man, and oil to make his face to shine, and bread which strengtheneth man’s heart.

16 The trees of the Lord are full of sap; the cedars of Lebanon, which he hath planted;

17 Where the birds make their nests: as for the stork, the fir trees are her house.

18 The high hills are a refuge for the wild goats; and the rocks for the conies.

19 He appointed the moon for seasons: the sun knoweth his going down.

20 Thou makest darkness, and it is night: wherein all the beasts of the forest do creep forth.

21 The young lions roar after their prey, and seek their meat from God.

22 The sun ariseth, they gather themselves together, and lay them down in their dens.

23 Man goeth forth unto his work and to his labour until the evening.

24 O Lord, how manifold are thy works! in wisdom hast thou made them all: the earth is full of thy riches.

25 So is this great and wide sea, wherein are things creeping innumerable, both small and great beasts.

26 There go the ships: there is that leviathan, whom thou hast made to play therein.

27 These wait all upon thee; that thou mayest give them their meat in due season.

28 That thou givest them they gather: thou openest thine hand, they are filled with good.

29 Thou hidest thy face, they are troubled: thou takest away their breath, they die, and return to their dust.

30 Thou sendest forth thy spirit, they are created: and thou renewest the face of the earth.

31 The glory of the Lord shall endure for ever: the Lord shall rejoice in his works.

32 He looketh on the earth, and it trembleth: he toucheth the hills, and they smoke.

33 I will sing unto the Lord as long as I live: I will sing praise to my God while I have my being.

34 My meditation of him shall be sweet: I will be glad in the Lord.

35 Let the sinners be consumed out of the earth, and let the wicked be no more. Bless thou the Lord, O my soul. Praise ye the Lord.

There’s that wonderfully melancholy but self-absorbed song in Jesus Christ Superstar about the spiritual transformation of the 12.  It’s called “Always Dreamed that I’d be an Opossum” or something like that (they’re all drunk while Jesus is waiting to be arrested).  A totally appropriate thought for Pentecost, I suppose….

Equally blasphemous is my question about Psalm 104: WHY would God have created “the Leviathan….to play therein?”  (or in a more modern translation “the Leviathan, who thou created just for sport”).  Some passages in the Bible are so hard to deal with…. But on the whole Psalm 104 is so beautiful, and so evocative of the natural balance of the world.   All those lions eating other creatures at night and stuff—“It’s the CIRCLE, the Circle of Life….”

I’d say that Harvard is actually the Oldest “Trademark”/Corporate Name in the United States, Yale is 64 years younger…..if “New York Times” and “Scientific American” Qualify—why not the oldest institutions of higher learning on the continent?

America’s Oldest Brands

24/7 Wall StBy Douglas A. McIntyre, Alexander E.M. Hess and Samuel Weigley | 24/7 Wall St – Wed, Aug 22, 2012 2:54 PM EDT

Consumers, it seems, are always after the shiny new product. For some industries, the latest version is always the most popular — the newest smartphone, tablet and sneaker are always the products in highest demand. Not surprisingly, some of the most valuable brands are relatively young. Apple, Google and Nike is each worth tens of billions of dollars and has tens of millions of customers.

Nevertheless, many of the most well-known brands with the most valuable brand equity include some of the country’s oldest companies. American Express, founded in 1850, is one of the hundred most valuable brands in the world, according to a list published by Interbrand, a branding consultancy. Coca Cola, Heinz and Jack Daniels are also on the Interbrand list and are all over a hundred years old.

24/7 Wall St. went in search of America’s oldest brands. To be considered, the brand had to have remained the same — the same name and consistently associated with the same consumer product. While almost all of the brands were not nationally available in the 19th century, the products had to be nationally available today.

[More from 24/7 Wall St.: Ten Brands That Will Disappear In 2013]

Many of the oldest products were not included. Though it has been around for over 200 years, Jim Beam was previously sold as Old Tub and its name did not change to Jim Beam until the 1930s. The company that makes King Arthur flour was founded in 1790, but didn’t adopt the name until the end of the 19th century.

While there are a number of companies that were founded in America over 150 years ago, most remained small regional brands. Yuengling has been brewing since 1829, but continues to be a beer that’s almost exclusively distributed in the Northeast.

Of course, some brands made the cut. Remington does not make the same rifles it did in 1848, but the current models are continuations of the brand’s core product. The New York Times (NYSE:NYT), founded in 1851, has a different typeface and trim size today, but is very similar to the one printed 150 years ago. Even NYT.com has the same front page layout.

What does it take for a brand to survive and thrive for over 150 years, which is as long as Brooks Brothers’ ready-to-wear suit brand has been around? Most brands on our list have done well for many decades because they continue to be well-regarded by consumers. Remington rifles are among the best made in the world. Tiffany silver is still considered the “gold standard” for products in its category. Each of these products may have different competition than a century ago, but continues to be relevant in the current industry.

Will Apple (NASDAQ: AAPL) or McDonald’s (NYSE: MCD) survive into the next century? There is no assurance of that. They could become unexpectedly overwhelmed by competition, or they could radically change their businesses. There is no way to predict product longevity, as least based on the variety of brands on this list and the competition each has had to survive.

These are America’s Oldest Brands.

1. Baker’s Chocolate

> Product: Chocolate
> Product launched: 1780
> Company founded: 1780

Baker’s Chocolate has, as a brand, been produced consistently since 1780, when Dr. John Baker purchased the outstanding shares in his own company from his partner’s widow. One representative of Kraft Foods, present owners of the brand, told 24/7 Wall St. that “not much has changed, except the packaging.” Yet even the packaging has remained remarkably consistent over time. La Belle Chocolaterie, the female figure seen on packages of Baker’s, has been featured on Baker’s Chocolate packages for over 100 years.

2. Crane & Co.

> Product: Stationery
> Product launched: 1801
> Company founded: 1799

Crane Paper has been made since 1799, when Zenas Crane began milling cotton paper. Under Zenas, the company began producing stationery paper in 1801. Among those who used stationary crafted from Crane’s paper were Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, and the Queen Mother—who announced the celebration of her 100th birthday using Crane’s paper. Crane & Co. has continued to use cotton paper, even as other companies have moved to tree pulp for making paper, a cheaper alternative. The company’s cotton paper is not just used for stationary, but also for currency. Since 1879, the company has provided the U.S. Treasury with currency paper, a business which accounts for a lion’s share of their revenue.

[More from 24/7 Wall St.: America’s Most (and Least) Livable States]

3. Remington

> Product: Rifles and rifle barrels
> Product launched: 1818
> Company founded: 1818

Remington was founded in Ilion Gulch, New York by Eliphalet Remington II. Though it started by making gun barrels, according to the National Firearms Museum, Remington made its first completed firearm in 1848, when it was contracted by the U.S. Navy to manufacture 1,000 Jenks carbine rifles. The company has evolved somewhat since its founding. It incorporated as a stock company called E. Remington & Sons in 1865. In 1888 it was acquired by Marcellus Hartley and partners and renamed Remington Arms Company. From 1933 to 1993 it was partly, and later wholly owned by E.I du Pont de Nemours & Co. Despite all these changes, Remington rifles have been a constant. Of course, the rifles Remington makes have evolved to the present semi-automatic, autoloading models manufactured and sold today.

4. Schaefer Beer

> Product: Beer
> Product launched: 1842
> Company founded: 1842

F. & M. Schaefer Brewing Company, which makes Schaefer Beer, was founded by brothers Frederick and Maximilian Schaefer. Frederick had immigrated to the U.S. from Germany in 1838, and Maximilian followed him in 1839, bringing along a formula for lager. By 1842, the two brothers purchased a small brewery in New York City. Over the 19th and 20th century, the company, and its beers, developed a wider following. An advertising campaign created the famous jingle, Schaefer — “the one beer to have when you are having more than one.” By 1971, more than 5 million barrels of beer had been brewed. In 1981, the F. & M. Schaefer Brewing Company was purchased by the Stroh Brewing Company, which was purchased by the Pabst Brewing Company in 1999. Despite these changes in ownership, Schaefer Beer is still sold today.

5. Poland Spring

> Product: Beverage
> Product launched: 1845
> Company founded: 1845

Though people tend to think bottled water is a relatively new product, Poland Spring proves them wrong. In 1845, the Ricker family began bottling and selling spring water. By 1860, Poland Spring was being sold all over the country. Driving the brand’s early fame was its affiliation with the Poland Springs Resort and its purported health benefits. The brand remains as popular as ever: Poland Spring was named the strongest bottled water brand in 2012 by the Harris Poll EquiTrend study.

6. Scientific American

> Product: Magazine
> Product launched: 1845
> Company founded: 1845

Scientific American, a magazine dedicated to science and technology, was founded in 1845 by Rufus Porter. At the time, it was a weekly broadsheet carrying the subtitle, “The Advocate of Industry and Enterprise, and Journal of Other Improvements.” Porter sold the magazine after 10 months to Orson Desaix Munn and Alfred Ely Beach for $800. The publication also founded the first branch of the U.S. Patent Agency in 1850 to give technical and legal advice to aspiring inventors. More than 140 Nobel laureates have written for Scientific American in its history. Today, the publication is owned by Macmillan Publishers Ltd. Scientific American notes that the monthly print magazine is read by 3.5 million people worldwide, and 3.88 million people a month visit its website, ScientificAmerican.com.

7. Merriam-Webster

> Product: Reference books
> Product launched: 1847
> Company founded: 1831

In 1843, G. & C. Merriam Co. purchased the rights to Noah Webster’s 1841 edition of An American Dictionary of the English Language, Corrected and Enlarged. In 1847, Merriam published its first Merriam-Webster dictionary. Though one of the country’s oldest brands, Merriam-Webster makes significant efforts to keep track of the latest linguistic trends. In Aug. 2012, the company released its list of new words to be added to its Collegiate Dictionary. The list included words such as man cave, underwater (to describe mortgages), aha moment, and gastropub.

[More from 24/7 Wall St.: America’s Worst Companies to Work For]

8. Brooks Brothers

> Product: Menswear
> Product launched: 1849
> Company founded: 1818

Brooks Brothers was founded in 1818 by Henry Sands Brooks, with the first store located in New York City. The company made the first ready-to-wear suits in 1849, and it has sold them ever since. The company notes that those flocking to California in the 1849 Gold Rush could not wait for tailors for custom clothing, relying on Brooks Brothers for their suit needs. Today, the New York-based company has approximately 200 stores in North America and an additional 130 stores in other parts of the globe. The company has greatly expanded its offerings since 1849 too, selling formal and casual wear for men, women and children.

9. Tiffany & Co.

> Product: Silver
> Product launched: 1851
> Company founded: 1837

Tiffany & Co., originally founded as a “stationery and fancy goods emporium,” has been a leader in the industry for over 150 years. The company’s importance can be seen in the impact it has had on the silverware and jewelry business. Tiffany & Co. has used the same 925/1000 standard for silver purity since 1837 — a standard later adopted by the United States government for sterling silver. At the 1867 Paris Exposition Universelle, Tiffany was the first American company to win an award for its silverware. In 1871, the company introduced a flatware pattern, called “Audobon”, which to-date remains the company’s best-selling flatware. Today, Tiffany sells silver bracelets, necklaces, piggy banks, and silverware among other items.

10. The New York Times

> Product: Newspaper
> Product launched: 1851
> Company founded: 1851

The first edition of the New York Times was published on Sept. 18, 1851. The paper began publishing its Sunday issue in April 1861. After the paper’s acquisition by Adolph S. Ochs in 1896, the Times adopted its present motto, “All the News That’s Fit to Print.” In 1912, the paper was the first to report of the Titanic’s sinking. In 1918, the Times was awarded its first Pulitzer Prize, the second year the price was offered. To date, 108 Pulitzer Prizes and citations have been given to the newspaper.