Tag Archives: President Jefferson Davis

“The Damnation of Confederate Memory”

Of course, the real reasons for the removal of all traces of competing views of history is Orwellian:
“Every record has been destroyed or falsified, every book rewritten, every picture has been repainted, every statue and street building has been renamed, every date has been altered. And the process is continuing day by day and minute by minute. History has stopped. Nothing exists except an endless present in which the Party is always right.”

A specific example of propaganda with genocidal and repressive intent:

this utterly despicable May 22 New York Times article, which Brother Nathanael mentions, exemplifies the conspiracy to falsify both the past and the present history of the United States of America and the South:

I say we have to fight back— Kirk David Lyons has established the Southern Legal Resource Center an “Antithesis” to the SPLC, which I completely endorse:

https://slrc-csa.org/

https://www.facebook.com/SOUTHERN-LEGAL-RESOURCE-CENTER-INC-162676542868/

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NEPA for NEW ORLEANS—Monuments & the Cultural Environment of New Orleans—invitation to join me in a new lawsuit to Save New Orleans’ Confederate Heritage

The Fight must go on to save our Southern and Confederate heritage in this beautiful city:
Last week, on March 6, 2017, Judges Higginbothom, Elrod, and Higginson of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit summarily upheld Judge Barbier’s ruling Monumental Task Committee v Foxx et al, (Confederate Era Monuments) 157 F.Supp.3d 573 (USDC EDLa, 26 January 2016) without further comment or opinion.  
Back in the Fall of 2015, I suggested at one or more of the New Orleans City Council “Hearings” prior to the removal ordinance that the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) provided an alternative litigation strategy. Now that the first round attempts have failed, I wonder whether any of you would be willing to join with me, as pro-se plaintiffs if necessary, asserting that the monuments should not be taken down without an Environmental Impact Statement under NEPA. I know one lawyer who might take this case, but we would have to pay him. I could draft and prepare research (using the Westlaw access at Tulane Law Library if necessary).
If any of you would be willing to contribute your names, time, or money to this cause… or have a group, please write to me at charles.e.lincoln@gmail.com. I will write back or call anyone who would be seriously interested in talking about this.  Even the Monumental Task Committee itself could amend its complaint to include NEPA and abandon some of its counts which didn’t work.  I looked at Judge Barbier’s opinion from last January again and it’s just a denial of a Preliminary Injunction, not a final judgment, so there won’t be any problem with res judicata…even though they lost the first round, they could apply again for a new injunction.  In short, NOTHING IS OVER AND DONE WITH YET.  THIS STORY COULD JUST BE BEGINNING if we have the will to fight…
We could certainly discuss this proposal here on Facebook, also. I know that the preservation of the monuments is at least in part a political question, but so is the preservation of the Grand Canyon, Yellowstone, and Yosemite. NEPA permits us to argue that these monuments are part of the social and cultural fabric of the city, that New Orleans is heavily subsidized by the Federal Government, and that no Federal Funds, or subsidized city funds, should be spent on this project without a full Environmental Impact Statement.
I would suggest that we could lend more weight to this argument if we were to propose that the monuments are embedded in the Victorian Matrix of the City, and that, in fact, New Orleans’ Victorian Architecture and Heritage, including these monuments, should be preserved as a UNESCO World Heritage Site…. Again, I made this proposal on the floor of the City Council meetings about 18-15 months ago. Some of you may have heard me, but nobody was willing to join me at that point.
The Monumental Task Committee did a heroic job, but it was not legally imaginative or creative. 17 December 2015 Monumental Task Force Verified Complaint for Declaratory & Injunctive Relief, USDC EDLA, 2015_WL_9302986  17 December 2015 Monumental Task Force Verified Complaint for Declaratory & Injunctive Relief, USDC EDLA, 2015_WL_9302986.

 I suggest that there are other avenues we could explore, but I sure don’t want to try it alone…

Can Racial Reconciliation be achieved by Ignoring or Falsifying History? An Open Letter to the Episcopal Bishop of Louisiana regarding “Truth, Honor, and Pride”

I have basically been very happily based in New Orleans, Louisiana, since I arrived here from Maui, Hawaii on December 9 of last year.  You know, there are ups and downs everywhere, but I had missed living in this city ever since I graduated from the Tulane College of Arts & Sciences on May 11, 1980, and have wanted to return here ever since.  I actually did return for several years 1997-2000, but was so wrapped up in my problems in Texas, I was basically bouncing back and forth.  One of the most consistently agreeable aspects of my life in New Orleans has been attending Church at Christ Church Cathedral on St. Charles & 6th Street, occasionally visiting at Trinity on Jackson right around the corner from my temporary home on Prytania (since March 8, 2013). One of the things I love most about New Orleans is its history—basically it’s impossible to take a walk, anywhere in this city, and not confront history face-to-face, it’s everywhere.  Basically, even the majority of the historic architecture in French Quarter really dates from the 19th century city, the actual 18th century buildings number in the dozens at the highest possible count.  The Garden District and “Uptown Audubon” mark a progression through the 19th century into the 20th.  St. Charles itself has been hideously scarred with mid-twentieth century cheap apartment buildings which took the place of many blocks of Victorian houses… but to either side of St. Charles, the historically decimating devastation is less.

How few people realize just how deeply New Orleans was shaped by the ante-bellum era and how loyal it was to the Confederate States of America, ESPECIALLY AFTER (ironically enough) the collapse of that nascent Federal Republic in 1865.

It is also undeniably true that the question of race-relations hangs like a sword of Damocles over the heads of the people of New Orleans.  The question comes up all the time, usually in emotional and rarely in analytical terms.

Ever since I heard, at the beginning of September, about an “Ecumenical Mass of Racial Reconciliation” being planned for January 12-21, 2014, I have been reflecting on the question of race and history in this wonderful town, this city where by dint of history black Americans first created a kind of “Jazz Aristocracy” recognized all over the world in the 1920s….

I wrote my initial thoughts on this question in a letter I just completed and delivered on Wednesday to the Episcopal Bishop of Louisiana and other members of the Clergy at Christ Church and Trinity Church.  

I have been told that in the bad old days of the Civil Rights movement, when the barriers of segregation were first being torn down, they had special “greeters” at Christ Church would take black folks aside and suggest to them that they might be “more comfortable elsewhere.”   The inversion of history is so great, I more than casually wonder whether I’ll now be afforded the same treatment for challenging the modern “politically correct” mythos of race.  

I attach here two versions of my letter to the Bishop and Clergy—only one of which I actually delivered (the October 2, 2013 version in which I reflect on the sinfulness of pride).  

2 October 2013 Letter to Bishop Thompson of Louisiana

1 October 2013 Letter to Bishop Thompson of Louisiana

I owe a great debt to two of my California friends who read over this letter before I delivered it: Shelene Emily Peterson of Belmont and Daniel Christian Mack of San Juan Capistrano.  Shelene keeps my English in line and tries to control my tendency to ramble (obvious with only limited success, although you should see how much she cut out….).  Dan made me realize the error of asserting, oxymoronically, “pride” which is inimical to Christian faith—although it is a critical element of human identity and sanity, it seems to me, that we must love ourselves for what we are.  And our ancestry shapes us, both culturally and genetically, whether we would wish it so or not.